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    Watch + fitness tracker?

    So I have a bit of a dilemma. I like wearing my watches. Nothing too expensive but nice automatics that look good. My work is now giving us some incentive to wear fitness tracker or a smart watch. If a smart watch, I'd like to find something to wear most of the time and then use my watches occasionally.

    For fitness tracker I’m thinking the Fitbit charge 3. It gets me HR tracking, sleep tracking, activity metrics, and a countdown timer for timing my rest at the gym. A co-worker recommended Garmin Fenix 5 for a smart watch, but I can likely find something a bit cheaper.

    Does anyone here wear a regular watch and a fitness tracker? Maybe one on each wrist? Any recommendations on a smart watch that looks decent with the features I mentioned?

    #2
    I wear a watch on one wrist and a Charge 3 on the other. Depending on the situation, it can look odd, but I'm past the point of caring.

    If you go the smartwatch route, it's hard to recommend anything other than an Apple Watch. Based on your description it sounds like an Apple Watch will be overkill, and I'd go with a Charge 3 or check out the new Fitbit releases if you want something that is a smaller profile.

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      #3
      I have been thinking about the same issue. I am looking at this watch, maybe not wear a watch when I have this on as it looks more traditional. https://www.withings.com/us/en/steel...SABEgKDi_D_BwE

      Or I was thinking of a ring as my monitor and keeping my regular watch. https://ouraring.com

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        #4
        Originally posted by Creature View Post
        <snip> My work is now giving us some incentive to wear fitness tracker or a smart watch. <snip>
        Can you elaborate on what kind of incentive they are offering you? Thanks!

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          #5
          I had this dilemma... I tried a Misfit Ray on my right wrist since it looks more like a bracelet. Later I got a more full featured Garmin smart watch which I wore as my only watch for a bit. Ultimately I felt wearing a fitness tracker was just triggering my OCD and reverted back to standard "dumb" watches.
          Ben

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            #6
            Originally posted by DocDave View Post
            Can you elaborate on what kind of incentive they are offering you? Thanks!
            Sure, it is a monetary incentive per quarter based on goals. I have wanted a tracker to do HR and sleep for a little bit now but put it off because it isn’t necessary. The incentive is making me really consider it.

            Originally posted by LesserBlackDog View Post
            Later I got a more full featured Garmin smart watch which I wore as my only watch for a bit.
            What Garmin did you get and what features were you using? Seems to me most of these are made for endurance athletes (long distance steady state cardio). I’m pretty much the opposite of that so only a small subset of the features matter to me.

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              #7
              I'd just wear a Rolex and not have anyone tracking my life.

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                #8
                Originally posted by Creature View Post
                Sure, it is a monetary incentive per quarter based on goals. I have wanted a tracker to do HR and sleep for a little bit now but put it off because it isn’t necessary. The incentive is making me really consider it.
                Read the disclosures carefully to see what type of information is tracked and who has access to it. Working in the financial industry I've been asked by clients to check programs such as this offered by their employer and occasionally found some egregious privacy violations.

                Examples include employers being able to see minute-by-minute data on employee location and type of activity, selling data to third parties, internal databases accessible to anyone else in the program, and more.

                Also keep in mind that insurance companies will share this medical information with each other, and can use it to adjust premiums on new/existing policies, or deny claims. Easy example: declare on your application you have no known heart issues, but the activity tracker shows occasional high blood pressure. Ergo, you had a diagnosis or test for high blood pressure you did not disclose and your policy is invalid. Older version would be not disclosing use of the BP tester in a pharmacy. Mortgage insurance offered through banks/lenders is notorious for this post-claim denial.

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                  #9
                  I wear a watch on my wrist and a Fitbit Flex 2 on my ankle. The Fitbit company recommends you not wear it on your ankle, but I've found that (1) it generally tracks steps accurately with a over/under (usually over) of about 0.5% to 1% compared to my wrist tracker (a Charge 2), (2) it tracks bike pedaling as steps, which I like, (3) it doesn't track extra steps when I tap my foot or have a nervous leg twitch. The biggest downsides are that it doesn't track heart rate or give detailed sleep reports. Another downside is that it looks like a house-arrest ankle monitor when I take off my sock.

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                    #10
                    Thanks [MENTION=12684]Creature[/MENTION]. [MENTION=7205]Galcobar[/MENTION] hit on many of the reasons I asked about the incentives you were/are being offered. I do not wish to hijack the thread, but if you want to continue chatting about privacy issues of wearing a work sponsored health tracker feel free to send me a PM. Or if enough people are concerned, I suppose we can always start up a public thread too

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                      #11
                      Thanks [MENTION=13399]DocDave[/MENTION] and [MENTION=7205]Galcobar[/MENTION]. I just sent a request to figure this out. As far as I know it isn’t tied directly to health insurance but you’re right, I should look into it. Once I get the info back, I’ll reach out if needed, thanks for the offer.

                      For this thread, let’s pretend that it’s all good... no ones going to use my info against me! Anyone else using these trackers while trying to stay dapper/discreet?

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                        #12
                        Originally posted by Creature View Post
                        What Garmin did you get and what features were you using? Seems to me most of these are made for endurance athletes (long distance steady state cardio). I’m pretty much the opposite of that so only a small subset of the features matter to me.
                        I forget the model number but I started with a Fenix and then switched to a Forerunner because the Forerunner was smaller, lighter, and better-shaped to fit under a shirt cuff. It had the full package of features, GPS + continuous HRM + general tracking etc. I used it to track my runs, walks, hikes, and crossfit workouts, though I had to pair it with a HRM chest strap in order for the HRM to be accurate during activities. There are definitely much cheaper options out there if you're not looking for something with GPS functionality.
                        Ben

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                          #13
                          I went through this dilemma for several years. First, I wore an analog watch on my left wrist and a fitbit on my right. I did that for a while, and then ditched the watch and just wore the fitbit. Then I used a Samsung smart watch for several years. Now I am back to just wearing watches. Here are several things I concluded, but your experience may be different:

                          1. Life is simpler and easier wearing just a watch. One less device to charge. One less thing to fiddle with. One less thing that monitors me. One less thing to "upgrade" every few years.
                          2. I didn't really learn anything useful with a "smart" device on my wrist. If I walk more, I have more steps. If I walk less, I have less steps. It's about as useful as the MPG gauge on my car. Obviously, if I hit the gas hard, I am getting poor gas mileage, and if I am coasting downhill, I get great gas mileage. Regarding heart rate, most gym machines will measure it for you. I am old, so we used to use a watch to check our pulse.
                          3. Step counting is very inaccurate. No one seems to talk about this. I work in NYC. A lot of days, I walk from the Port Authority bus terminal to my office. The fitbit registered many more steps than the Samsung, or an iPhone in my pocket. On average, I would say that 10,000 steps on a fitbit is equivalent to 6,000 steps on a Samsung smart watch. I suspect the truth is somewhere in between.
                          4. A hunk of black plastic on my wrist is not very good looking.

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                            #14
                            I want to get a fitness tracker and wear it on my ankle. I wore a tracker on my wris and it just wasnt very accurate I hook my thumbs in my backpack while hiking, I push the cart at the store, etc etc and none of those record hand movements. On the flip side, I move my hands while i talk so I was logging steps while on conference calls lol.

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                              #15
                              My fitbit recently helped me figure out that something was wrong with me when my resting heart rate went up over the span of a month. I had mononucleosis and the rise of my resting heart rate was a great sign to go get checked, for which I am grateful.

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