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Brooks brothers AE - thoughts?

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  • ryan850
    replied
    Did most people size up a width from their normal AE size due to the poron insole?

    Leave a comment:


  • mebejoseph
    replied
    Originally posted by srlclark View Post
    walnut burnished McGregor, so I wanted to check whether they are the same color. She said that they are. (The photos look very different but we know they are unreliable). Anyway, she also denied that bourbon is made by taking walnut leather and then burnishing it with black. She said it's a different color and always has been. That was definitely not my understanding. I thought it was widely acknowledged that bourbon was discontinued because it ended up with tiger striping so much of the time from the burnishing. I'll have to look into this further, unless anyone has any information about it.
    I really like my bourbon MCallisters. I haven't had the tiger striping issue appear. And because I got them on close-out, the price made them sweeter.

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  • ryan850
    replied
    I just received my pair of BB McAllister.

    My AE strands and PA are 10D and they fit perfect (borderline a little loose of I had to be picky)

    Stepping into the BB shoes, they are very low volume. My foot sits much higher with the poron insoles and there is some slippage at the heal due to a higher height.

    Wondering how much the poron insoles break in and decrease in height.

    Thanks!

    Leave a comment:


  • mochi123
    replied
    I thought they are all same quality

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  • Loafer28
    replied
    Originally posted by srlclark View Post
    In my experience, Dainite is also much less comfortable. It is initially very uncomfortable because it is so stiff and inflexible. But even after it's broken in, it is not very comfortable, because the studs aren't level with the rubber, so you occasionally get an uneven footing. All in all, I prefer the rubber half-sole or vibram/Topy. They may not be quite as durable, but they are still overall far preferable. And I prefer leather to Dainite, too. Comfort and style beat out longevity. At least for someone with a deep collection.
    I can attest to this personally and recently. I am at a conference where I am on my feet for 8 hours a day. I wore my leather soled Carlos Santos yesterday and felt fine at the end of the day (we even walked a mile or so through the French Quarter). I wore my Dainite soled AE University today and couldn’t wait to get them off. My feet are so sore. I am switching shoes to take my clients to dinner tonight.

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  • ryan850
    replied
    I went ahead and got a pair of the burgundy McAllister. Already have a pair of standard AE strands and PA, so well see the difference.

    Thanks for the input everyone

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  • srlclark
    replied
    Originally posted by Token View Post
    the rubber replaces the leather in the front of the shoe, so there's no additional height added to the shoe from the rubber. It's basically AE's version of a sleek rubber sole. Unless you're staring from close up you wouldn't be able to tell that it's rubber and not leather, whereas something like Dainite adds a bit of bulk.
    In my experience, Dainite is also much less comfortable. It is initially very uncomfortable because it is so stiff and inflexible. But even after it's broken in, it is not very comfortable, because the studs aren't level with the rubber, so you occasionally get an uneven footing. All in all, I prefer the rubber half-sole or vibram/Topy. They may not be quite as durable, but they are still overall far preferable. And I prefer leather to Dainite, too. Comfort and style beat out longevity. At least for someone with a deep collection.

    Anyway, I just had an interesting conversation with the Allen Edmonds' customer service. I am thinking about getting a walnut Leiden or walnut burnished McGregor, so I wanted to check whether they are the same color. She said that they are. (The photos look very different but we know they are unreliable). Anyway, she also denied that bourbon is made by taking walnut leather and then burnishing it with black. She said it's a different color and always has been. That was definitely not my understanding. I thought it was widely acknowledged that bourbon was discontinued because it ended up with tiger striping so much of the time from the burnishing. I'll have to look into this further, unless anyone has any information about it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Token
    replied
    Originally posted by SWong37 View Post
    Isn’t v-tread a leather sole with rubber over it?
    the rubber replaces the leather in the front of the shoe, so there's no additional height added to the shoe from the rubber. It's basically AE's version of a sleek rubber sole. Unless you're staring from close up you wouldn't be able to tell that it's rubber and not leather, whereas something like Dainite adds a bit of bulk.

    Leave a comment:


  • jim3
    replied
    Whenever AE offers their deep discount sale ($245.00 for shoes built on the 65 last) I order a pair with Poron insoles and Dainite soles. I'm normaly a D width, so with the Poron insoles, I size up to an E width. Super comfortable. In addition, I doubt AE is crafting the BB shoes out of any different leather than their AE branded shoes.

    Leave a comment:


  • srlclark
    replied
    In my opinion:

    1. V-tread rubber half-sole (or Vibram, etc).
    2. Leather sole.
    3. Dainite sole.

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  • SWong37
    replied
    Isn’t v-tread a leather sole with rubber over it?

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  • ianr
    replied
    There is some consideration to leather vs rubber soles.

    This blog post goes over everything in detail

    http://www.theshoesnobblog.com/2017/...ber-soles.html

    I would personally take a quality rubber sole over junk leather, but do prefer quality leather in general.

    I would add that I haven't found AE leather soles to be particularly high quality. Soles from Puy en Velay and J. Rendenbach are what I consider high quality. I don't know exactly what AE uses, but the soles show wear quickly as stated above.
    Last edited by ianr; February 13, 2018, 04:39 PM.

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  • winghus
    replied
    The Poron insole is uncomfortable and if you have a higher than normal instep like me you may need to actually go up a width or two.

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  • Token
    replied
    Originally posted by doomx View Post
    Leather soles are "luxurious" out of the box but once you wear them for a dozen times, they become less so. Quality rubber soles are very nice.
    This. If I had the choice I'd switch out all of my AE leather soles to V-tread soles. To a certain extent, when you choose leather soles, you're choosing looks over durability, and AE leather soles don't really offer much in terms of looks. No closed channel stitching, no fiddleback waist, and they're less durable compared to higher quality leather soles like JR. One wear on an AE leather sole looks like five wears on a JR sole.

    Leave a comment:


  • LesserBlackDog
    replied
    I refuse to buy leather soled shoes anymore. Tried to wear a pair of my old ones a few weeks back... I was slipping and sliding and almost fell on my ass on ice/snow that has never been a problem with rubber soled shoes.

    I’m not going to waste my money on a work shoe that I can’t wear six months out of the year.

    Leave a comment:

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