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Just getting into mens fashion....trying to find my "style". I'm wasting money. Help

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    #16
    Originally posted by utopify View Post
    excellent - thank you. I'm finding look books are helping. One thing I have noticed however, regarding instagram/fashionbeans, etc.. is that it is hard to tell the materials. Case in point, I made the mistake of trying to go casual with a dress shirt (heavier dress shirt, pressed...instead of a looser poplin or oxford?). Nothing irritates me more then when I try to mimic look books....but make some cardinal sin.
    There are subtle differences between materials and cut on casual and dress shirts, and you are right, a dress shirt doesn't work all that well casual. Consider a basic Oxford Cloth button down for the more casual look (depending on how formal your office is, these can be fine at work as well).

    Also, I just looked at Gentleman's Gazette for the first time. His look is not for me (nor does it really fit in in my workplace or even town). He is also wrong about the aesthetics of the Pelikan 1000 Fountain Pen, but that's another rant for another day

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      #17
      I totally understand where you are coming from. I honestly prefer Ashley Weston's Youtube channel / website as well as Tanner Guzi's youtube channel. Tanner focuses on what is right for your style archetype and occasion. It is not the traditional wear this. I dont get a ton of ideas as far as clothes but more of understanding how and why to dress a certain way. Ashley Weston is one of my favorite resources. I also like the Gentlemans Gazette but it is a little to dandy for my taste. I def will say it was a great help in the beginning.

      The only one i cant stand is Real Men Real Style. I think that guy is so annoying, a fraud, kinda douchey, and nothing but videos pushed through ad money.

      I agree with many others. You need a solid wardrobe that works well with all of your items. They refer to it as a minimalist wardrobe. Dont go after things that pop out at you on their own. Make sure everything you buy works well with your other items.
      Last edited by neminat; December 6, 2017, 03:01 PM.

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        #18
        I also agree with bassopotamus. If OP is worried about wasting money, I think it would make sense to start with the basics.

        First, split your style goals into work and weekend/casual wear. Then think about looks you really like and think about the items that (1) stand out to you and (2) are integral to the outfit. For example, if you're really into a workwear look, you would probably want to get the right pair of boots and the right pair of denim to start. When you're looking for those items, you would think about fit and try to find what fits, but is also the look you want. Once you've nailed look and fit for those items, then move to the next ones.

        Also, as someone who's slowly built his work style out to be more mature but also more casual for weekend times, I would also suggest starting with basic pieces/patterns. So, get things in more conservative colors/patterns to start to see if you like them and then move to bolder things. That way, you have items that work in more situations and aren't stuck with bold pieces that you're not comfortable rocking regularly. For example, I've started getting better fitting t-shirts, but I'm never sure about a color/pattern until I've worn it a couple of times. So, I've started with buying 1 t-shirt in gray or white, seeing if I like the fit after a few weeks, then replacing t-shirts I don't like, rather than just buying a bunch right after trying it on at the store.

        Also, if you have specific looks you're thinking about, don't be afraid to suggest them. This group's pretty generous from what I've found.

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          #19
          Originally posted by Fantasma View Post
          I also agree with bassopotamus. If OP is worried about wasting money, I think it would make sense to start with the basics.

          First, split your style goals into work and weekend/casual wear. Then think about looks you really like and think about the items that (1) stand out to you and (2) are integral to the outfit. For example, if you're really into a workwear look, you would probably want to get the right pair of boots and the right pair of denim to start. When you're looking for those items, you would think about fit and try to find what fits, but is also the look you want. Once you've nailed look and fit for those items, then move to the next ones.

          Also, as someone who's slowly built his work style out to be more mature but also more casual for weekend times, I would also suggest starting with basic pieces/patterns. So, get things in more conservative colors/patterns to start to see if you like them and then move to bolder things. That way, you have items that work in more situations and aren't stuck with bold pieces that you're not comfortable rocking regularly. For example, I've started getting better fitting t-shirts, but I'm never sure about a color/pattern until I've worn it a couple of times. So, I've started with buying 1 t-shirt in gray or white, seeing if I like the fit after a few weeks, then replacing t-shirts I don't like, rather than just buying a bunch right after trying it on at the store.

          Also, if you have specific looks you're thinking about, don't be afraid to suggest them. This group's pretty generous from what I've found.
          Yeah, that's excellent advice about focusing on fit and starting sort of conservative. I have a few fairly obnoxious patterned casual button downs that I get a lot of compliments on (Dark blue floral, white that has a sort of 50s formica look to it), but really, just start with whites, light blues, etc and work out from there.

          And you don't have to go too crazy on spending either. Some of my favorite stuff lately has been gap/old navy bought at 40% off or better, and the new Goodfellow line at Target has some great inexpensive pieces (Just try to find them in person and try on, some of the sizing is a little wonky).

          I'd also suggest, if you are going for riskier stuff, perhaps keep that on the cheaper side so you're not out too much. I wear glasses, and found a great source of cheap prescription one (Zenni Optical) that lets me take some risks. I wouldn't spend 200 bucks on bright blue translucent plastic frames, but for 20 bucks, it's a no brainer. Often, I use glasses as sort of an accent piece with otherwise more subdued things. Of course, this only works if you need glasses, but I think you could use the same logic for other stuff.
          Last edited by bassopotamus; December 6, 2017, 03:08 PM.

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            #20
            I'm not sure if this helps, but part of my method of buying clothes is not allowing myself unlimited funds. I try to keep each year's expense under $1,000, for example. The average consumer spends more than that on generic, disposal crap, so I figure $1,000 is a decent place to start. This also has the effect of limiting my impulse stupidity to extreme sales and thrift store items.

            Sent from my SM-N910V using Tapatalk

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              #21
              If you're really lost, I disagree with many here about looking at look books, Instagram, etc. You will never find your own style that way if you don't have a starting point.

              Since you are completely starting over, do what [MENTION=3886]drocpsu[/MENTION] suggested. Only buy well made basics that fit you flawlessly for the next 6-months to a year. There are plenty of articles about the men's basic/starter pack wardrobe (charcoal or navy suit, white and light blue dress shirt, dark wash denim, etc). Make a checklist and start picking off those items.

              Spend some time figuring out how all of those pieces interact. Mix and match to make basic, flawless fitting fits. When you feel comfortable there, start adding in your personal flair. Start small, like a patterned tie you really like. Then progress until you can pull off those blackwatch pants with cableknit turtleneck with a cashmere camel top coat.

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                #22
                In addition to the sources stated above, take a gander at the Essential Man -

                This article, I think, hits at addresses most of the major points/tips discussed so far.
                http://theessentialman.com/a-beginne...-dress-better/

                Have fun -- I'm excited for you!

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                  #23
                  Originally posted by connersw View Post
                  Spend some time figuring out how all of those pieces interact. Mix and match to make basic, flawless fitting fits.
                  It sounds like this is what the OP is getting at -- having a lot of things but having a tough time putting it all into one package. I'm surprised I haven't yet seen anyone recommend the "how to wear it" from the $1500 wardrobe, as that's exactly what Joe does. Take the basic, timeless, staple pieces, purchased at reasonable prices, and use them to assemble a substantial number of outfits that can take you anywhere: https://dappered.com/2016/11/how-to-...wardrobe-2016/

                  The pieces mentioned there are honestly pretty boring, and certainly don't set you up for any more out-there celebrity-esque fits. But consistent with the aesthetic of this site, I think the argument is that you are more likely to stand out in a positive way for doing simple things well (i.e., fit) than for doing crazy things poorly.

                  This reminds me of a thread that came up a couple weeks ago where someone asked what piece of clothing people owned that generated the most compliments. Responses almost invariably consisted of the loudest or most garish items in people's wardrobes. It's not surprising; the average person can't NOT comment on your purple chinos. Someone commented that they much preferred when they're told simply that they "look good." I would agree.

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                    #24
                    IMO, for business casual look at what is the norm at your workplace and take a step above in formality and make sure your clothes actually fit well. If cargo pants and polo is the norm, go to chinos and quality polo or button up shirt. Switch from sneakers to a PTB or chukka. The change in actual clothing is not that different yet will look much better and may not draw any unwanted notice except "he looks better than before but I can't place why".

                    As for street wear, how "streetwear" do you want to go? Hollywood actors can wear whatever they want due to fame but that doesn't mean it would look good on some guy walking down the street. If you want your look outside of work to be vastly different from work clothes then you'll need separate wardrobes for each. My weekend clothes range from business casual to sport coat and tie (which some consider business casual) and I have little interest in "streetwear". I have started going for a workwear look in order to blend in more with some of my younger friends when we go out and I've had an effect on them as they now dress nicer too. We meet somewhere in the middle most of the time we go out. Edgy is hard to pull off, expensive, and ephemeral. At 40, if you're as fit as Daniel Craig, you'll make virtually everything look good if it fits correctly and is age appropriate. I wouldn't necessarily take the SOs advice too seriously as you want to dress for you not someone else. If my wife had her way I'd wear skin-tight denim and boots with no shirt at home and only add a shirt when going out. This would be ridiculous and I'm sure as hell not wearing skin-tight anything.

                    Basic classic pieces for work and home to start, branching out from that as you decide which direction you want to take your personal style. Joe has tons of looks on the site and if something there excites you, try it out. You could probably buy the $1500 wardrobe and add a few pieces in more colors for each option and never need to buy anything else if you wanted.

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                      #25
                      Originally posted by elpenguinoloco View Post
                      It sounds like this is what the OP is getting at -- having a lot of things but having a tough time putting it all into one package.
                      Yes and yes. Thank you everyone, it has been very fun today (not getting any work done however) reading replies, as if we were all having a beer, and then searching out what you've suggested.

                      Very cool.

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                        #26
                        Thank you Winghus - great advice.

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                          #27
                          [MENTION=14726]Fantasma[/MENTION] Thanks! That was indeed what I was referring to.

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                            #28
                            If you're unsure how to wear a certain item, just do a google images search for said item and fashionbeans. For example, "cardigan" and "fashionbeans". You'll see how they incorporate the cardigan into different outfits. Save the looks that interest you.

                            Also, it is never a good idea to buy the most expensive item you can (or can't) afford when you don't know how to use it yet. Buy cheap first, get used to incorporating the item into different outfits, and if you really end up liking it eventually replace it with a better quality version.

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                              #29
                              Originally posted by julius12 View Post
                              If you're unsure how to wear a certain item, just do a google images search for said item and fashionbeans. For example, "cardigan" and "fashionbeans". You'll see how they incorporate the cardigan into different outfits. Save the looks that interest you.

                              Also, it is never a good idea to buy the most expensive item you can (or can't) afford when you don't know how to use it yet. Buy cheap first, get used to incorporating the item into different outfits, and if you really end up liking it eventually replace it with a better quality version.
                              Good advice here. The "cheaper" version of something I lust after usually scratches my itch for the more expensive item just fine and you get the thrill of the deal.

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                                #30
                                Originally posted by Jrbrownie00 View Post
                                Good advice here. The "cheaper" version of something I lust after usually scratches my itch for the more expensive item just fine and you get the thrill of the deal.
                                Indeed I feel I need to do this. I started out blowing 2k at Billy Reid, another 500 at uniqlo, jcrew, nordstrom....on and on. So I know I have some cool stuff, but I could have started much cheaper.

                                Case in point, the Billy Reid Bond Pea-coat. 800$ - there are some nice pea coats around 100. Mistake ...because I rarely wear it or know how to pair it. Pea coats almost look empty without a scarf, but I hate scarfs...always make me feel claustrophobic and I know it may sound stupid (don't make fun of me) but I was bullied in high school and was yanked to the ground from behind by a scarf. Yes, that sparked a career in US Army combat arms...but that's another discussion.

                                Thank you all for the tips.

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