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Abercrombie & Fitch: What Happened?

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    #16
    Originally posted by Pepetito View Post
    why the negative association with A&F? It was all anyone wore when I was like 14-18.
    I am surprised that more people here weren't fans. That said, it is either what the cool kids wore, or what the jerks wore. Those two classes of people often overlapping. The CEO embodied this, he was basically a gay, clothing instead of real estate, version of Trump. They got rid of him when sales dropped and rebranded. By then A&F was dated in the eyes of it's fans.

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      #17
      Originally posted by hornsup84 View Post
      tyty

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        #18
        Lot of I'm too cool in here from people that haven't been paying attention. The "rebranding" at the stores (no loud music, no cologne, less logo) is ~2-years old.

        The mens line was completely turned around when they brought in Aaron Levine. He came up through Jack Spade and ran Club Monaco until it was picked up by Mr Porter. For the last year they have been turning out great stuff, and run massive sales too (Cone Mills cinos for <$50).

        But hey, everyone on here is better than Chad, right?

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          #19
          Really like the new AF direction. I have 2 jackets and a couple shirts I've bought from then over the last year, and they were all great values.

          I was probably a little old for the maximum bro AF, plus i lived in a small town so there wasn't access to their stores anyway. I do remember the loud music when we did make it to the mall, and annoying adds with shirtless dudes though.

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            #20
            Originally posted by connersw View Post
            Lot of I'm too cool in here from people that haven't been paying attention. The "rebranding" at the stores (no loud music, no cologne, less logo) is ~2-years old.

            The mens line was completely turned around when they brought in Aaron Levine. He came up through Jack Spade and ran Club Monaco until it was picked up by Mr Porter. For the last year they have been turning out great stuff, and run massive sales too (Cone Mills cinos for <$50).

            But hey, everyone on here is better than Chad, right?
            We each have a choice of where to purchase clothing from. I prefer to do so from places that didn't have Mike Jeffries or the embodiment of his mantra making them money for a long time. I don't see that decision changing for some sales gear that's wearable. I also don't really shop at malls too often, so have no reason to pay attention to their rebranding. YMMV, of course. Sorry you seem to be taking offense to others not being on your level.

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              #21
              I'm not putting myself on any level. Everyone is free to purchase whatever they want from wherever they want. If you choose to not purchase from a place based on personal/political views, then that is for you to decide.

              I just find it laughable when self proclaimed members of the all inclusive crowd make disparaging remarks about a brand or the people that wear it based on the stereotype of a 15-year old marketing campaign.

              I hope you can see the irony of "I'm too cool to shop there because it's a cool guy/bro store" vs "I'm cooler than everyone else because I wear this cool guy bro-brand."

              My point was they are just clothes, and A&F has been making some good ones for a while now at better than average prices.

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                #22
                Ell oh ell. A 15 year old marketing campaign? No. We’re talking about the culture of the brand. A culture of exclusion and disdain that was very deliberately cultivated by CEO Mike Jeffries for two decades until he “retired” just a few years ago. He only left the company in 2014.

                A brand is more than just the stuff it sells. A brand is also the reputation it has cultivated and the relationships it has created with customers... and potential customers. Abercrombie spent decades creating the reputation it now “enjoys.” It spent decades literally telling certain potential customers that their business was neither wanted nor needed, because they weren’t cool enough or thin enough or sexy enough or rich enough. No one is required to ignore that reputation or that relationship and let Abercrombie wipe the slate clean. It will take a lot longer than that for Abercrombie to shake off the reputation and relationships it worked so long and so hard to earn...
                Ben

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                  #23
                  Originally posted by Pepetito View Post
                  why the negative association with A&F? It was all anyone wore when I was like 14-18.
                  At my school many wore it, but it was a dividing line. Those who had more money wore it. It was at the mall that was 30 minutes away. The local mall had Aeropostale and AE, with A&F moving in later, after peak popularity. I mainly started with Aeropostale during middle school until I got tired of the logos, then went to AE. Never did make it up to A&F. Took a turn to Gap/BR, and checked out Martin + Osa while they were still around.

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                    #24
                    Originally posted by connersw View Post
                    I'm not putting myself on any level. Everyone is free to purchase whatever they want from wherever they want. If you choose to not purchase from a place based on personal/political views, then that is for you to decide.

                    I just find it laughable when self proclaimed members of the all inclusive crowd make disparaging remarks about a brand or the people that wear it based on the stereotype of a 15-year old marketing campaign.

                    I hope you can see the irony of "I'm too cool to shop there because it's a cool guy/bro store" vs "I'm cooler than everyone else because I wear this cool guy bro-brand."

                    My point was they are just clothes, and A&F has been making some good ones for a while now at better than average prices.
                    Nothing is ever "just clothes" to some people just as nothing is ever "just food" to others.

                    More fun reading about A&F and their former leadership. No thanks.

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                      #25
                      Originally posted by LesserBlackDog View Post
                      Ell oh ell. A 15 year old marketing campaign? No. We’re talking about the culture of the brand. A culture of exclusion and disdain that was very deliberately cultivated by CEO Mike Jeffries for two decades until he “retired” just a few years ago. He only left the company in 2014.

                      A brand is more than just the stuff it sells. A brand is also the reputation it has cultivated and the relationships it has created with customers... and potential customers. Abercrombie spent decades creating the reputation it now “enjoys.” It spent decades literally telling certain potential customers that their business was neither wanted nor needed, because they weren’t cool enough or thin enough or sexy enough or rich enough. No one is required to ignore that reputation or that relationship and let Abercrombie wipe the slate clean. It will take a lot longer than that for Abercrombie to shake off the reputation and relationships it worked so long and so hard to earn...
                      Well said.

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                        #26
                        Originally posted by LesserBlackDog View Post
                        Ell oh ell. A 15 year old marketing campaign? No. We’re talking about the culture of the brand. A culture of exclusion and disdain that was very deliberately cultivated by CEO Mike Jeffries for two decades until he “retired” just a few years ago. He only left the company in 2014.
                        One can say the same thing about Rolex, BMW, LV and many other high end brands.

                        The truth is it's all about the brand image, popularity and the right marketing approach. Customers have very short memory indeed. What worked in late 2000's is outdated now. The millennials today see Underarmor as old and not trendy enough. Nike is having some serious marketing issues as well while Adidas came back to life. JCrew has had their share of marketing ups and downs. GAP has reinvented itself and all of a sudden is in.

                        If you're talking about the culture of the brand then look no further than Uber. I don't see them struggling much. On the other hand, Starbucks as a textbook citizen has seen some disappointing results especially in the US.

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                          #27
                          Originally posted by Greyone View Post
                          One can say the same thing about Rolex, BMW, LV and many other high end brands.

                          The truth is it's all about the brand image, popularity and the right marketing approach. Customers have very short memory indeed. What worked in late 2000's is outdated now. The millennials today see Underarmor as old and not trendy enough. Nike is having some serious marketing issues as well while Adidas came back to life. JCrew has had their share of marketing ups and downs. GAP has reinvented itself and all of a sudden is in.

                          If you're talking about the culture of the brand then look no further than Uber. I don't see them struggling much. On the other hand, Starbucks as a textbook citizen has seen some disappointing results especially in the US.
                          I don't know if I would say Rolex and BMW "deliberately create a culture of exclusion and disdain." If that is your opinion of those brands, fine. But that's not the same at all as A&F. They were sued multiple times in federal court over their hiring practices (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gonzal...ch_Stores,_Inc. & https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Equal_...6_Fitch_Stores)

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                            #28
                            Originally posted by Greyone View Post
                            The millennials today see Underarmor as old and not trendy enough.
                            The oldest millennials are 14 years older than Under Armour. Can we please stop using the world "millennial" as if it means "clueless 21-year old"?

                            Originally posted by Greyone View Post
                            If you're talking about the culture of the brand then look no further than Uber. I don't see them struggling much.
                            Then you're not looking. Uber lost $2.8 Billion in 2016. They just fired their CEO after repeated scandals. 400,000 customers actually deleted their accounts and while their business is still growing, it's now growing slower than Lyft in large part because of their tarnished brand.

                            Originally posted by Greyone View Post
                            On the other hand, Starbucks as a textbook citizen has seen some disappointing results especially in the US.
                            Disappointing in that growth was lower than expected. They still grew by most measures and earned over $4 Billion during their last fiscal year. Starbucks seems to be doing pretty well still.

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                              #29
                              Originally posted by dpark View Post
                              The oldest millennials are 14 years older than Under Armour. Can we please stop using the world "millennial" as if it means "clueless 21-year old"?
                              Side topic: This always gets to me, for some reason. Generations are 20 year periods but people born in 1980 are NOTHING like those born in 1999. Just like those born in 1960 are a far cry different than those born in 1979. For example, I was born in 1987 so I am considered a "millennial" but the vast majority of things associated with millenials is not applicable to myself nor anyone around my age: we don't use "fam," we didn't grow up with tablets or smart phones, we had dial up internet, we watched Saturday morning cartoons, we rolled up our windows etc. The millenials that were born in the late 90s seem to be what people associate with ALL millenials which is completely false. We really should have 10 years for "generations" instead of 20, 20 is just far too long of a time. Myself, being 30, has far more in common with someone in their mid to late 40s than someone in their early 20s and the same is true for most people I know that are my age.

                              Sorry, just wanted to rant about the millenial designation a bit.

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                                #30
                                Originally posted by LesserBlackDog View Post
                                Ell oh ell. A 15 year old marketing campaign? No. We’re talking about the culture of the brand. A culture of exclusion and disdain that was very deliberately cultivated by CEO Mike Jeffries for two decades until he “retired” just a few years ago. He only left the company in 2014.

                                A brand is more than just the stuff it sells. A brand is also the reputation it has cultivated and the relationships it has created with customers... and potential customers. Abercrombie spent decades creating the reputation it now “enjoys.” It spent decades literally telling certain potential customers that their business was neither wanted nor needed, because they weren’t cool enough or thin enough or sexy enough or rich enough. No one is required to ignore that reputation or that relationship and let Abercrombie wipe the slate clean. It will take a lot longer than that for Abercrombie to shake off the reputation and relationships it worked so long and so hard to earn...
                                It was very strange reading that article.

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