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Conditioning leather shoes overnight?

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  • batkins9
    replied
    The foil wrap aspect seems very odd to me. That's where maintaining your clothing becomes somewhat indistinguishable from fictional magical incantations.

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  • Token
    replied
    That sounds like you're over-conditioning the leather. If you're stuffing the leather with oils from the conditioner then it'll be fuller or "puffier so it'll probably feel softer, but that's not necessarily good for the integrity of the leather. At the very least, the wrapping in foil and leaving for 2 days should be unnecessary.

    I agree with [MENTION=4069]JBarwick[/MENTION] and [MENTION=4677]Shade[/MENTION] as far as shoe care philosophy goes: less is more. Part of it is that I don't have the time to spend half an hour on every shoe in my collection, part of it is that if I used that much conditioner I'd be burning through cases of renovateur (and my wallet), but I also don't think it's necessary either. Shoes (even dress shoes) are built to withstand quite a bit of wear and tear, and high quality shoes use high quality leather which is more durable, resilient, and needs less help. By far the most important component of shoe care is to let them rest in between wears. Conditioning and polish can be done sparingly unless you want to have a mirror shine every time you step out the door.

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  • Frldyz
    replied
    Well I did condition them overnight.

    1. Applied light coat of conditioner by fingers ( not towel or dobber ). Let sit few hours.
    2. Applied 2nd coat much thicker by fingers to entire outside of shoe including into the welt and underneath on the sole.
    3. Wrapped looseley in tinfoil or syran.
    4. Come back 1-2 days latter.

    *Maybe this is a bad technique or overboard and unecessary. But I think it worked great. My leather has never looked and felt so soft and smooth before.

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  • JBarwick
    replied
    Originally posted by Shade View Post
    Wrapping shoes in anything after conditioning them seems like bizarre overkill. People are really weird about their shoes on many of these forums. Wear them, keep em clean, and condition and polish them every so often. They are shoes not antiques. IMO of course.
    I agree with this. Also Joe has mentioned that he has never conditioned his shoes and they still look fine. I might condition my shoes once a year if that and only apply cream or wax polish as needed to keep them shining or to cover scuffs.

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  • Shade
    replied
    Wrapping shoes in anything after conditioning them seems like bizarre overkill. People are really weird about their shoes on many of these forums. Wear them, keep em clean, and condition and polish them every so often. They are shoes not antiques. IMO of course.

    Leave a comment:


  • dpark
    replied
    It's probably not going to hurt anything if you wrap your shoes in foil, but you might get unlucky, cause a metal reaction, and ruin your shoes. If you really want to do this, it's safer to use plastic wrap or a ziplock-type bag.

    But I also don't think this is useful. You don't want your shoes overconditioned. Overconditioned shoes bleed grease onto your pants and are weaker than properly conditioned shoes.

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  • Hierophant
    replied
    Originally posted by Frldyz View Post
    I just use Allen Edmonds condition cleaner. Once its gona I'm gonna pick up some saphir.

    I'm just wondering by warpping the shoes in a seal tin foil after applying some condition if this will hrt my shoes at all.
    I just want to lock everything in so as much as possible wil get sucked into the leather and not evaporated.
    I think there's a big difference between the AE conditioner and Saphir Renovateur (but you've got to be okay with the mink oil in the Renovateur, which ... is an ethically dark gray area for me).

    I wouldn't wrap my shoes after conditioning them; I'd be seriously concerned about trapping moisture against the leather. Remember that conditioning them is about getting oil into the leather, NOT about getting water into it. (My understanding of the chemistry is that leather needs to be conditioned periodically because it no longer produces oil and water to form the skin barrier; without the skin barrier, the water won't do anything, and the oil does all the work.)

    If your shoes feel really dry, you could give them a couple layers of conditioner or cream.

    Remember also that leather needs to be cleaned periodically to ensure that oil can get into its pores. Renovateur is a good start, but I've noticed my shoes looking much better with a quarterly application of Saphir Renomat (which is seriously strong cleanser) and Saphir dubbin grease. Deep clean, deep moisture.

    Leave a comment:


  • Frldyz
    replied
    Originally posted by Hierophant View Post
    So, it depends what you mean by conditioner.

    If you mean Saphir Renovateur or similar, it shouldn't make a difference how long you leave it on -- as long as you leave it on long enough to dry, because "it's dry" means all the available oil has either been absorbed into the leather or actually dried up.

    If you mean dubbin grease, you SHOULD leave it on for at least 24 hours (I think 48 is recommended?) because it takes that long for the topmost layer to dry completely.

    Ultimately it's not about time as such, it's about dryness as a sign of absorption.



    I just use Allen Edmonds condition cleaner. Once its gona I'm gonna pick up some saphir.

    I'm just wondering by warpping the shoes in a seal tin foil after applying some condition if this will hrt my shoes at all.
    I just want to lock everything in so as much as possible wil get sucked into the leather and not evaporated.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hierophant
    replied
    So, it depends what you mean by conditioner.

    If you mean Saphir Renovateur or similar, it shouldn't make a difference how long you leave it on -- as long as you leave it on long enough to dry, because "it's dry" means all the available oil has either been absorbed into the leather or actually dried up.

    If you mean dubbin grease, you SHOULD leave it on for at least 24 hours (I think 48 is recommended?) because it takes that long for the topmost layer to dry completely.

    Ultimately it's not about time as such, it's about dryness as a sign of absorption.

    Leave a comment:


  • Frldyz
    started a topic Conditioning leather shoes overnight?

    Conditioning leather shoes overnight?

    Has anyone tried or thought of applying conditioner/moisturizer to their leather shoes and sit overnight to help soak all the lotion?

    In the past I've always applied with cloth and tried. Cleaned well but not sure how much actually was absorbed into the pores of the leather.

    I saw a video of some shoe guy on youtube that said he conditions his shoes and lets sit overnight to help maximize the lotion getting into the pores.

    I did this couple days ago. I applied a thin-moderate amount of lotion on the shoes and just let it sit. Next morning you could tell a significant differance in how the leather felt. And 2 days after even more.

    I'm curious what might happen if I do this tonight. I'm gonna try.
    Condition my shoes with mod. amount of the cream including the sole. Rub very little lotion into the leather. Wrap shoes loosely in tinfoil.

    I'm wondering if this will help absorb more lotion into the leather instead of just drying out.
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