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Dappered Cologne Hate

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    Dappered Cologne Hate

    After reading the latest post on summer style mistakes, I feel like I need to defend wearing cologne in summertime.

    Maybe Dappered isn't a fan of fragrance, but you can easily wear fragrance without overbearing people.

    Really, summer fragrances are of the least offensive and more often garner compliments since they're usually inoffensive. Citruses and 'clean' fragrances are usually popular choices in summertime. I don't see how wearing something from the Creed line (Erolfa, MI) or Tom Ford (Neroli Portofino) or maybe a cheaper Atelier Cologne. I've had people not enjoy some skanky, strong fragrances that I wear in the freezing temps, but never once has anybody been overwhelmed by a summer fragrance. If anything, performance is the issue.

    If you're still worried, you can look to where you apply fragrance. Maybe don't put it on your neckline, which is close to peoples nose. There are options.

    #2
    if you wanted to be a big stinky cologne covered dude in the privacy of your own home, i think that's ultimately your business.

    but when you bring it outside to public places, it's never not overbearing. It's commonly thought of as overwhelming, and even rude. No one you meet on a daily basis. wants to walk into a cloud of 'you'.

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by evanparker View Post
      but when you bring it outside to public places, it's never not overbearing.
      Reasonable minds can disagree. As @op said, it might be a performance issue.

      Comment


        #4
        I don't really get the hate either. I use a little cologne nearly every day. I don't find it any more noticeable than when I run out of my relatively odorless soap or shampoo and have to use my wife's stuff in the shower. Like dressing well, I'm doing it for me. I'm not trying to cover up anything or broadcast to the world that I'm wearing something. Obviously you don't want to overdo it.

        Those high school bros who bathed in drakkar noir have unjustly given cologne wearers a bad name.

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          #5
          Completely agree with OP. As with other aspects in style, there are best practices (that you break at your own risk - but you do you). I'd say hitting the wrong pulse-points or laying it on like a teen with his first bottle of axe is more akin to very loud or pompous dress. Understated is good.

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            #6
            Too much cologne, a cheap cologne, etc. all go to ruin someone else's day because the wearer felt the need to impose their scent of choice on others. This is particularly important in places like NYC, where you are in a variety of situations during the day where you're in relatively tight and enclosed quarters with other people (e.g., subway cars and elevators) where the effect of cologne is increased due to the small space, high heat/humidity of summer and high bodies/space ratio. I don't have any allergies or over-sensitivities, but I've had my eyes water when someone is wearing too much cologne. Further, there are plenty of people in the world that are sensitive to strong smells like colognes (and even more scented soaps). To those people, even if you're "doing it right", you're still offensive and will ruin their day.

            With all those things weighing against it, to me, it's frankly just easier and less of a hassle to err on the side of soap and deodorants and calling it a day. I still smell clean/fresh, but no one respecting my personal space will ever smell me or the scents on my body. I do own a few colognes, but never wear them to work and rarely even during daylight hours; mostly they're reserved for cooler weather date nights, formal events and such, and even then I don't typically break them out.

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              #7
              Originally posted by hornsup84 View Post
              Too much cologne, a cheap cologne, etc. all go to ruin someone else's day because the wearer felt the need to impose their scent of choice on others. This is particularly important in places like NYC, where you are in a variety of situations during the day where you're in relatively tight and enclosed quarters with other people (e.g., subway cars and elevators) where the effect of cologne is increased due to the small space, high heat/humidity of summer and high bodies/space ratio. I don't have any allergies or over-sensitivities, but I've had my eyes water when someone is wearing too much cologne. Further, there are plenty of people in the world that are sensitive to strong smells like colognes (and even more scented soaps). To those people, even if you're "doing it right", you're still offensive and will ruin their day.

              With all those things weighing against it, to me, it's frankly just easier and less of a hassle to err on the side of soap and deodorants and calling it a day. I still smell clean/fresh, but no one respecting my personal space will ever smell me or the scents on my body. I do own a few colognes, but never wear them to work and rarely even during daylight hours; mostly they're reserved for cooler weather date nights, formal events and such, and even then I don't typically break them out.
              For the reasons you lay out, and others, I very rarely wear cologne even though I like it quite a bit. I just disagree with the categorical statement that it can't be done.

              Comment


                #8
                Really depends on the scent. It's pretty hard to wear any of the Standard Dude Fragrances without being disruptive (Drakkar Noir, Armani Code, Aqua di Gio...) but when I think of summer fragrances, I mostly think of gentler things with less sillage, like Neroli Portofino and some of Tauer's gentler ones (esp. the new L'Eau). It's doable. Just need to take context into account.

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                  #9
                  Also FWIW: to my nose, most Standard Dude Deodorants (esp. Old Spice) are as or more noticeable than fragrances. I'd almost rather deal with somebody wearing too much Drakkar than too much Pure Sport.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I think we all just need to spritz wisely.

                    In the cooler months I wear Royall Rugby spraying once on the back of my neck at the base of the hairline, and once on my wrist which is then rubbed on the opposing wrist, and wiped further on my neck pulse points. I do the same in the spring and summer with Royall Lyme. It's subtle, and usually not noticed by anyone except my wife who appreciates both.

                    There you go.
                    instagram.com/cutandbasted
                    cutandbasted.tumblr.com

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Is it really important to mix up the heavier scents for a lighter scent in the summer? For example is it bad to wear a more 'woodsy' sent in the summer as opposed to a citrus one?

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by DocDave View Post
                        Is it really important to mix up the heavier scents for a lighter scent in the summer? For example is it bad to wear a more 'woodsy' sent in the summer as opposed to a citrus one?
                        Fragrance obsessive here:

                        I think the summer versus winter distinction between scent types is largely arbitrary. For some people, woody fougeres (which are green and bitter) are all over the place in terms of what they evoke; they smell like winter to me, but to my best friend they smell like fall.

                        For me, the big difference is in sillage (i.e. how far the scent projects away from your body). Wearing a scent with a lot of sillage indoors during the summer always seems to me like a bad idea, because the increased heat and exposed skin will mean it projects even further. Better to save the notorious stinkers (Drakkar, Aqua di Gio, anything from Amouage...) for winter when you can keep them under layers and under wraps.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          There is probably a cultural/geographic element to this. Where I live in the mountain West, I don't know any men who wear cologne. Women here occasionally wear perfume or cologne, but usually only for going out or special occasions.

                          I typically feel "over-scented" just from using my (mildly scented) daily grooming products (soap, deodorant, shave balm, moisturizer, hair product, lip balm).

                          IMO wearing anything but the absolute subtlest of fragrances - the kind you can only smell when you are within about six inches of someone - is wildly inconsiderate to others. On top of the fact that someone might just find your favored fragrance really obnoxious, there are also many people whose allergies or asthma are easily triggered by fragrances and perfumes. They may find themselves trapped with you and your scent in a situation they cannot reasonably escape (e.g. public transit, elevator, a small room, etc). In all the music ensembles I've ever been in - where people are in close quarters on stage, doing lots of purposeful breathing and sweating in tuxes under hot stage lights - there have always been strict "deodorant = yes, cologne = no" policies.
                          Ben

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                            #14
                            Personally I fall into the category of those who prefer to only wear it in the fall/winter. I usually run pretty hot and with the addition of the humid summers here on the coast the stuff just leaps off of me to stink up a room. That being said, I'm a big fan of cologne and my current favorites are Aqua di Gio and Oud Wood by Tom Ford which both work great for the fall/winter and happen to be pretty strong scents.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              I conservatively apply my cologne, and I've never been given a nasty look or been told my smell was too strong by anyone. During the warm months I rock Savage by Dior and I get compliments all the time, especially from women; they really seem to love that citrus/woodsy smell. During the colder months I like Legend by Montblanc - even had a woman here in the office call it "panties dropper fragrance." As already mentioned in this thread, if you're offending people with your applied scent, it is likely a performance issue.

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