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  • ianr
    replied
    On Saphir Renovateur, I would like to say I use it because it has good coverage and sinks in gradually allowing for even treatment... but that's not really it. I like it because it smells like turpentine instead of the petroleum distillate similar products have. The shoes also don't smell bad after. It's a little thing, but I have unused containers of other products because of smell. (Reminds me... I should try to give some of that away.)

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  • Danny
    replied
    [MENTION=14949]mmgfarb[/MENTION] thanks!

    I like the look of your shoes post-scuffs and post-polish better than I liked them brand new
    I like them better now too... but it's not because of the conditioning/polish. They look better because you can tell that the leather is starting to soften up. When it comes down to it, worn, soft leather always looks better than pristine, hard leather IMHO.

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  • drzenitram
    replied
    While pristine shoes look nice on the showroom floor, a well-loved pair of shoes will look like they've been worn enough times to fall in love with. You'll get scuffs and creases, you'll get discoloration and your conditioning and polishing won't restore the shoes to like-new appearance. However, with regular wear, regular conditioning and polishing, regular shoe tree use, and keeping them away from really nasty stuff like snowy slush and oils, your shoes will develop something beautiful called a patina. I like the look of your shoes post-scuffs and post-polish better than I liked them brand new.

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  • mmgfarb
    replied
    Originally posted by Danny View Post
    Just conditioned and polished a pair of shoes for the first time.

    BEFORE:


    AFTER:


    It's not perfect (you can see a bit of color discrepancy between the overall burbon color and the bourbon polish on the toes), but it's pretty damn good. No one would notice this unless they got on hands and knees to inspect my shoes.
    Those look great, good job!

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  • Danny
    replied
    Just conditioned and polished a pair of shoes for the first time.

    BEFORE:


    AFTER:


    It's not perfect (you can see a bit of color discrepancy between the overall burbon color and the bourbon polish on the toes), but it's pretty damn good. No one would notice this unless they got on hands and knees to inspect my shoes.

    Leave a comment:


  • srlclark
    replied
    [MENTION=14386]Danny[/MENTION]: I don't use Sapir. I use AE conditioner cleaner. The rest sound good but I agree about getting neutral polish, too.

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  • srlclark
    replied
    Yeah, that's what I'm concerned about, too. I assume that the bourbon polish is basically just a medium-brown polish. Some reviewers say that using it will make the shoe duller over time, so that while still medium-brown overall, it lack the depth achieved by the combination of the walnut with the black. I wonder what the effect of trying to replicate AE's process would be, e.g. using walnut polish three times out of five and then using black polish twice out of five. Or four and one, maybe. I think some store associates suggesting occasionally buffing the shoe with a cloth used for black shoes, but I think that would just darken the shoe.

    With any luck AE is currently working on a shoe in which the bourbon color is achieved through dye and for which there are no problems about using bourbon polish.

    Incidentally, isn't oxblood also achieved by burnishing a lighter color on the black burnishing wheel? If so, do you know which color the lighter one is?

    Originally posted by dpark View Post
    I would definitely get some bourbon-colored polish to help cover the scuffs. You might also want to eventually pick up some neutral for the whole shoe. I would assume that repeated applications of bourbon polish will begin to mask the burnishing.

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  • dpark
    replied
    Originally posted by Danny View Post
    Allen Edmonds premium shoe polish, bourbon (is this the best color to get?) - $9.00
    I would definitely get some bourbon-colored polish to help cover the scuffs. You might also want to eventually pick up some neutral for the whole shoe. I would assume that repeated applications of bourbon polish will begin to mask the burnishing.

    Leave a comment:


  • Danny
    replied
    [MENTION=13548]srlclark[/MENTION] and everyone else who has commented: Your advice has been invaluable. I'm so appreciative of all your help, and I'm really happy with the AE's. I'm glad I had the benefit of your cumulative knowledge and was convinced to pay a bit more for lasting and noticeable quality.

    While all the individual components will add up a bit, I see these items as part of a long term investment in all of my shoes.

    Here's what i'm planning to get:
    Shoe trees (Nordstrom rack) - ~$13
    Kiwi Horsehair shoe brush - $7.00
    Quard Shoe cleaning cloth (Amazon) - $5.50
    Allen Edmonds premium shoe polish, bourbon (is this the best color to get?) - $9.00
    Total: ~$34.00

    Do I need shoe conditioner? If so, what brand is reccomended? I know people on here like using Sapir, but that seems pricy to me.

    I'm eager to get these stunners looking perfect again. Glad I have you all to point me in the right direction!

    Leave a comment:


  • srlclark
    replied
    Great advice, but it's not that costly. The shoe trees aren't cheap, but they are essential and cost less than 10% of the expenditure on the shoes. The rest is $10 or less each. It does mount up, but the shoe trees, the cloths, and the brush should last a good long while.

    [MENTION=14386]Danny[/MENTION]: Sorry this has proved such a stressful experience! I hope our advice has at least been useful. For now, I'd say enjoy your holiday, don't worry about the shoes too much, and wear the casual pair I see in the background whenever you can until you get back!

    Originally posted by devastitis View Post
    Did you get oil on them?

    You might have to hit them with a complete conditioning and shine, but it can be somewhat costly. You will need leather conditioner, bourbon shoe polish, a pair of shoe trees, a cloth or two, and one horsehair brush.

    Here's a good youtube link on how to care for your shoes. This is the basics of a condition and polish.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pCO8XtLT-1I

    And this one, if you're really serious, and got some coin to spend. This one is ideally a few times a year.
    https://www.hangerproject.com/shoe-c...e-shine-guide/

    Leave a comment:


  • ianr
    replied
    I would just condition and brush them. Specifically, I would use renovateur. I scuff my shoes regularly, it is no big deal. Eventually, the scuffs all even out as a patina.

    Leave a comment:


  • dpark
    replied
    I'd recommend trying to touch them up with some bourbon polish before going all-in with a full conditioning, etc. Rub a little polish into the scuffs and then wipe it off. Repeat if necessary. You can probably significantly reduce the visibility of the scuffs without doing a full treatment.

    Leave a comment:


  • devastitis
    replied
    Did you get oil on them?

    You might have to hit them with a complete conditioning and shine, but it can be somewhat costly. You will need leather conditioner, bourbon shoe polish, a pair of shoe trees, a cloth or two, and one horsehair brush.

    Here's a good youtube link on how to care for your shoes. This is the basics of a condition and polish.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pCO8XtLT-1I

    And this one, if you're really serious, and got some coin to spend. This one is ideally a few times a year.
    https://www.hangerproject.com/shoe-c...e-shine-guide/

    Leave a comment:


  • Danny
    replied
    Update: I wiped it off with a damp cloth, but it didn't really help things. I'm now on vacation and the scuffs have multiplied (it seems that I'm not exactly gentle on my shoes):



    Obviously, I can't really treat this stuff till I get home, but when I do what should I hit it with? So far I know I'm supposed to get a horsehair brush and a cleaning cloth, but I highly suspect that I'll need polish too. I've really come around on their color, so what will fix the scuffs but keep these bourbon?
    [MENTION=13548]srlclark[/MENTION] [MENTION=11797]devastitis[/MENTION]

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  • devastitis
    replied
    Originally posted by srlclark View Post
    [MENTION=14386]Danny[/MENTION]

    If I were you, I would at least wipe them down with a damp cloth before you leave town. As you don't have a cloth, do you have an old t-shirt you could use? Or, if all you're doing is wiping them down, a piece of kitchen towel? (Not good for the environment, but one piece probably won't herald the day after tomorrow). You could polish and buff them when you get back.

    [MENTION=11797]devastitis[/MENTION]: Do you use neutral or bourbon polish for your Dalton's? I've heard conflicting reports on which will maintain the color better.
    I don't actually use Saphir for cream polish, so I couldn't tell you. When I originally bought all my AEs, I bought everything from AE, cream polish/leather conditioner/edge dressing. So I have walnut/bourbon/dark brown cream polishes for my brown AEs. If I want to brighten them up, I'll use walnut polish. If I want to darken them, I'll do either bourbon or dark brown (very little bit as it's very dark brown).

    Leave a comment:

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