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How to Care for a Wool Peacoat

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    How to Care for a Wool Peacoat



    So spring is here and it looks like it's time to hang up my wool peacoat for the next 9 months. I was wondering how I should care for it? Some websites recommend that you dry clean your wool coats at the end of the winter while some websites say that dry cleaning your clothes such as suits, will take away from the life of the piece of clothing.


    #2


    I have a wool coat from Banana Republic and I dry clean it once a year. If you do it once a year or so it should be fine.

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      #3


      Now's a good time to do that annual dry cleaning before storing it in a cool, dark, dry place with cedar.


      Cleaning is a wear factor for clothing, but an annual basis is no big deal for something you wore regularly. You want to wash off oils, salt spray, and dirt that are sitting on the fibers. Just be prepared for a sticker shock if you're not used to the $35 cleaning price.

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        #4


        I think my dry cleaner charges about $15 per coat. Good point though. We should probably have a few sticky threads in regard to long term clothing storage, and maybe one dedicated to shoe care delimited by the material and step by step out of box care / pre-first wear up to regular maintenance.

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          #5


          I have my cleaned once a year as well. That infrequent of a cleaning really won't make a huge difference to the life of the garment.

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            #6
            I just got my wool peacoat this year and wore it only 4-5 times. Do I need to get it cleaned or can it wait until next year?

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              #7
              I only clean things that get dirty or smelly. No need to do it just because it's the end of its wearing season.

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                #8
                Woo zombie thread.

                I would give it a good brush-down with a clothing brush (I just use a clean shoe polish brush), then get it steamed and pressed to kill any microscopic buggers that may have taken up residence. Store it on a wide-shouldered hanger in a breathable, fabric garment bag to keep the dust and moths away.
                Ben

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                  #9
                  LOL. Thread necromancy.

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                    #10
                    I don't wash my wool peacoat, it doesn't smell or anything lmao. I do run a brush through it a few times and put cedar on a wide shoulder hanger to keep its shape. Then toss it in back of the closet til November.
                    "The key to Success is the Quality of Execution"
                    I>0<I

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                      #11
                      Originally posted by LesserBlackDog View Post
                      breathable, fabric garment bag.
                      Would a bag made of cotton canvas fit the bill? I never paid attention to the material of the bag before. What could result from using a sealed bag that didn't breath?

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                        #12
                        Originally posted by rlriii13 View Post
                        What could result from using a sealed bag that didn't breath?
                        Probably nothing. But, a plastic bag can trap residual moisture in the garment and cause mildew or mold. Plastics, particularly the cheap plastics used in dry cleaning bags and the like, also degrade over time and release gases and other byproducts that could theoretically damage or discolor garments.
                        Ben

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