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  • tankerjohn
    replied
    Charles Tyrwhitt hit the US market big like, what, ten years ago? That's about the right time frame for stuff to start showing up in thrift stores. Dude bought a bunch of bundle-deal "slim fit" CT shirts for a his first big job out of college in his 20's, now in his 30's the "slim" shirts aren't fitting so good anymore. Off to the donation box!

    Dress shirts are VERY hit or miss in thrift shops. Stains, holes, and other such blemishes are extremely common. Dress shirts are pretty much disposable items, like socks and undies. But every once in a while, there's gem, especially if the thrift store has new overstock items. For me to look twice at a dress shit in a thrift store, it really has to be in perfect condition and be an upper echelon brand, at least Brooks Brothers or equivalent. That Vineyard Vines shirt I mentioned above fit the bill, and it's probably my favorite shirt in my closet. I actually found a Turnbull and Asser shirt in my size once and I didn't buy it because it was pink. In retrospect, I wish I had just to say I owned a Turnbull and Asser shirt, and maybe I could have learned to love pink shirts.

    The major exception is oxford cloth shirts. Oxford cloth is one of those materials that looks and feels better when its a little bit - or a lotta bit - worn. Land's End and LL Bean are common enough in thrift stores and make pretty good OCBDs. J Crew for the skinny guys. I once found a made-in-USA OCBD from a now defunct men's store that had a lot of life in it. As with other dress shirts, stains and hole are a no go. But a little fraying at the collar or cuff is fine and actually makes the shirt that much cooler.

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  • Old Beaver
    replied
    I can't see used shirts being worth much so $4.99 sounds about right to me. Actually, I can't imagine anyone would want used shirts, but if they're cheap enough I suppose there's a market for almost anything...

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  • blan2819
    replied
    That's a great point. And speaking to that - what do you all think the fair price for a thrifted dress shirt should be? To me anything in the $4.99 or so range I think is fair/what I usually pay for. I've seen thrift stores have started to pay attention to brands and quality and I've seen dress shirts go for as much as $9.99 - which is still a steal, but a little more than I'd like to pay for a thrift store shirt.

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  • nathan miller
    replied
    Has anyone noticed Charles Tyrwhitt dress shirts have been showing up in thrift stores more than usual lately? I always seem to see a handful of shirts in multiple thrift stores (goodwill/salvation army) across multiple cities. Anyone have any idea why? Just curious.
    Hmmm....I have made a couple of purchases from Tyrwhitt and, I supposed based on that, have gotten several 3-for-$99 coupons, which is a pretty good deal if you need to replace some everyday shirts. That could be part of it if they're running these promos on a larger scale. That said, I check my local thrift stores probably monthly or so and I haven't seen any Tyrwhitt shirts at all.

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  • blan2819
    replied
    Has anyone noticed Charles Tyrwhitt dress shirts have been showing up in thrift stores more than usual lately? I always seem to see a handful of shirts in multiple thrift stores (goodwill/salvation army) across multiple cities. Anyone have any idea why? Just curious.

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  • evanparker
    replied
    i feel like that goodwill thinks their clientelle are naturally thesame people who go into TJ Maxx to hget a sweet deal on some "designer clothes brands" that are maybe 20% off MSRP on some of those SWEET ralph lauren shirt. If you wear one of those on your tinder date bro, the girls will just take their clothes off before you even get them in the car. girls LOVE THAT SHIT BRO.

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  • tankerjohn
    replied
    Thanks Evan, that's a great perspective. I've been told by our local Goodwill here in northern Virginia that all the donations go to a central warehouse and then are doled out proportionally to each individual store. Therefore, just because a store is in poor neighborhood X, doesn't mean the clothes are coming from there. And vice versa in the rich neighborhoods. Also, I've noticed that Goodwill cherry picks a lot of stuff to go on their auction website, which presumably brings in more money. Also, individual stores now have "premium" racks where they put the "high end" clothes. Well, sort of. I do get a kick out of finding Ralph Lauren LAUREN jackets on the premium rack for $50 and Hickey Freeman and Brooks Brothers jackets on the regular rack for $5. So, I suppose the pickers not be totally up to speed on "premium" brands.

    Otherwise, I wholly agree with you that the best spots are in the edge zone between affluent and less affluent areas. In particular, I find the smaller stores, like the ones that support hospitals or churches, are often better than the big Goodwills and Salvation Armies. Just like with fishing, in takes some trial and error to find a good honey hole.

    As I type this, it occurs to me that my entire outfit today was sourced through thrifting - Harris tweed jacket, Vineyard Vines dress shirt, Orvis khakis, Italian silk tie, and Alden dress shoes (which I left the "$4.99" sticker in for good measure). Good stuff is out there, fellas!

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  • evanparker
    replied
    Since i bought my house an hour south of my old neighborhood in Brighton, right next to Boston Univeristy, i haven't been thrifting in any successful way almost at all. I have a couple stores in providence but they are always picked clean, since it seems like there is definitely demand for the thrift items from multiple sorts of classes of people in the city. i haven't found anything really remotely good in maybe 6 moths, when i saw those shell wingtips that i really don't need.

    My old thrift spots, one of which actually closed anyways, and the other of which was the Goodwill store on Commonwealth Ave on the edge of Allston, i miss them so so much! lol...

    If i could impress any suggestions of 'how to thrift' into this thread, gained from my nearly 25 years going to Goodwill and digging around it would be that LOCATION IS KING. when thrifting. You never find anything in the thrift stores in the poor neighborhoods, they are picked SO CLEAN that sometimes it's just not even worth going inside. Same with the rich neighborhoods, the thrift stores have a couple good items occaisonally but no one really goes to those stores, so they don't have alot of turn over. Item turn over is the thing that brings stuff in the door and it is absolutley crucial.The best stores are always always the ones right on the dge of a good neighborhood and on the edge of a bad one. These stores have lots of demand, therefore turnover,, and lots of supply.


    The BU goodwill, next to a neighborhood of immigrants and poor 20 year old, and the BU rich rich people paying 50k a year plus to go there, the best one in the area.

    My childhood Savers, right on the boston line in West roxbury, and right on the line of Dedham a relatively rich upper middle class kind of town, most of it. This savers is EPIC and a place where most of my best stuff was ever dog up.
    Last edited by evanparker; February 26, 2021, 08:26 AM.

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  • mebejoseph
    replied
    Originally posted by evanparker View Post

    YOU KNOW it's funny, i haven't' done anything with them. i kind of already have wingtips like that anyway, and these don't even fit me

    the little rolled edging piece on the back top of the heel is kind of messed up. I thought maybe i could replace it but I haven't really had luck sourcing it. I also haven't looked that hard LOL

    i'm not exactly a shoe maker, maybe a shoe fiddler at best. I really don't think there is anything I can do. So they're just sitting on my shelf I guess.

    Mostly theyre in good shape, besides a few little spots i guess. sorry I wish i had more better news than that LOL
    Well, I got my shoes back from the patina guy today and I am impressed! They look better than I thought they could.

    So, if you want to invest about $350-$400 more into those shoes, I can refer you to some cobblers who fix them up and a person who can do a great job restoring the finish. But I'm guessing that's not what you want to do.

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  • evanparker
    replied
    Originally posted by mebejoseph View Post

    Have you continued getting them in better shape? I have some vintage Florsheim shell shoes--Just to win the ebay auction was $250. Then the resoling. And now I am waiting to get them back from yet another restoration project (stripping and re-dying because after I stripped off 50 years of polish, the leather in the shoes didn't match).

    I am into them for about what I would have paid for new Alden shell shoes. I don't think they were a good investment.

    But from a thrift store like yours? SWEET!
    YOU KNOW it's funny, i haven't' done anything with them. i kind of already have wingtips like that anyway, and these don't even fit me

    the little rolled edging piece on the back top of the heel is kind of messed up. I thought maybe i could replace it but I haven't really had luck sourcing it. I also haven't looked that hard LOL

    i'm not exactly a shoe maker, maybe a shoe fiddler at best. I really don't think there is anything I can do. So they're just sitting on my shelf I guess.

    Mostly theyre in good shape, besides a few little spots i guess. sorry I wish i had more better news than that LOL

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  • mebejoseph
    replied
    Originally posted by evanparker View Post
    These beautiful Shell Cordovan wingtips from the late 1970s were found at a local Savers store. I spent an hour polishing them for looking like they were covered in red mold to this kind of dull shine. I think they're going to need a lot more elbow grease but they will come back eventually.

    They were made for "VAUGHN AT SATHERGATE". This is a defunct Menay store 3000 miles west of me, formerly in Berklee CA


    Have you continued getting them in better shape? I have some vintage Florsheim shell shoes--Just to win the ebay auction was $250. Then the resoling. And now I am waiting to get them back from yet another restoration project (stripping and re-dying because after I stripped off 50 years of polish, the leather in the shoes didn't match).

    I am into them for about what I would have paid for new Alden shell shoes. I don't think they were a good investment.

    But from a thrift store like yours? SWEET!

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  • evanparker
    replied
    funny enough i have not had any good thrift trips since that one day i found the shell shoes.

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  • DocDave
    replied
    Wow. What an awesome find. I never think to look at the local second hand/shift shops for shoes. I might need to rethink that. Well done!

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  • evanparker
    replied
    These beautiful Shell Cordovan wingtips from the late 1970s were found at a local Savers store. I spent an hour polishing them for looking like they were covered in red mold to this kind of dull shine. I think they're going to need a lot more elbow grease but they will come back eventually.

    They were made for "VAUGHN AT SATHERGATE". This is a defunct Menay store 3000 miles west of me, formerly in Berklee CA



    Leave a comment:


  • gclefstreetwear
    replied
    I do thrift from time to time. The only reason I do not is it consumes so much of my time I'm usually stuck. Haha! But seriously, there are lot of legit items that can be found while thrifting.

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