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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Iron on binding tape. Wow. Great idea. Does it hold up pretty well? I don't mind sewing, but the idea of sewing something onto the raw cloth edges always seemed too intimidating. But iron on binding would be a lot quicker
    Last edited by TMann; February 17, 2019, 10:43 AM.

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  • jonATL
    replied
    Originally posted by Nandyn View Post
    Nearly new Banana Republic sport coat in 100% linen mini houndstooth I got from poshmark for a great deal. Spent a few hours this rainy afternoon removing the lining (acetate/rayon, so it wasn't the worst thing, but I'd much prefer just a butterfly) and binding the raw edges with iron-on binding tape..

    Before



    After
    Stunning work!

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  • Nandyn
    replied
    Nearly new Banana Republic sport coat in 100% linen mini houndstooth I got from poshmark for a great deal. Spent a few hours this rainy afternoon removing the lining (acetate/rayon, so it wasn't the worst thing, but I'd much prefer just a butterfly) and binding the raw edges with iron-on binding tape..

    Before



    After

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Shopping in a thrift store is different than a department store in that you should be able to walk into a department store and find whatever it is you’re looking for in the size/color that works for you: shirts, jackets, shoes, etc.

    Thrift shopping is more like shopping in an antique shop. You go in not expecting to find anything specific; rather you go into to see if there’s anything there that you like and that fits you. Sometimes you’ll find three really cool items that work for you; most of the time you won’t find anything. It’s the appeal of finding hidden “gems” that appeals to most thrift shoppers, including myself.

    I am a middle-aged, smaller-than-average guy with a decent income who lives in a cold part of the country. So when I go thrift shopping I there are things that I usually look at and other things I don’t even bother to look at.

    I always look through:
    1. Outerwear: This is always the first section I look through. I’ve bought at least a dozen jackets over the years. Currently, I have a Mac raincoat, three leather jackets, two peacoats, two other heavy cool topcoats, plus a few other light jackets that were all purchased at thrift shops. The great thing about a thrifted jacket is that the price is often 1/5 to 1/10 of the original price i.e. a $300 topcoat for $30.

    2. Suits/blazers: I’ve had less success here, but I’ve still managed to pick up a couple of nice blazers over the years. I don’t wear suits that often, so it’s not worth getting something if it’s going to need a lot of alterations.

    3. Button-up shirts: There are always a ton of button-up shirts in most thrifts stores. I don’t wear suits to work, so I tend to look at casual button-ups. I’ve gotten a number of patterned and oxford shirts over the years. It helps that I know how to sew, so I’ve purchased shirts that were really large and sewn in the sides to give them a more tailored fit. Just make sure that the shoulders fit and that the sleeves aren’t too long.

    4. Sweaters: For those of us that live in cold climates, you can never have too many sweaters, so I’ve picked up a few nice ones over the years. Fortunately, the fit of a sweater isn’t as finicky as it is with a suit jacket or even a button-up shirt.

    5. Briefcases/Bags: I usually look through the briefcases and bags just to see if anything interesting catches my eyes. I’m currently using a canvas/leather briefcase by Eddie Bauer that I bought for $6.

    I never look through:
    1. The T-shirt section: I tend to wear cheap t-shirts, so the cost difference between a thrifted t-shirt and a new one makes it not worth my time.

    2. Shoes: My feet are small, so it’s rare for me to find anything that is in my size (7.5.) Also, wearing shoes that belonged to someone else bothers me, so I don’t even bother to look.

    Successful thrifting is best if you look at it as a hobby. Figure out what sort of clothes you like to wear, stop by the store(s) often and keep an eye out for interesting stuff.
    Last edited by TMann; February 2, 2019, 01:28 PM.

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  • jonATL
    replied
    It's not like shopping in a department store, and as far as how nice/organized/etc. the Goodwill is, it really matters where it's located. Try it on for size, see if it's for you. If it's not, at least you know; if it is (and especially since you're in New York), welcome to your new obsession.

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  • Ron
    replied
    Strategy for thrift shopping

    I am traveling and find myself with some free time on my hands today and noticed there is a local Goodwill store.

    With no other plan I thought it might be fun to take a look and see if I can find a "gem" or two. I will be honest and say the thought fills me with a little apprehension as I don't recall ever shopping in a second hand store (other then antique shops my wife wanted to visit).

    Is it like shopping in a department store?

    I apologize in advance if the questions seems haughty. That is not my intention at all.

    Thanks for the insight.

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  • jonATL
    replied
    I assume these Dries Van Noten shoes, size 7, are women's. Pretty immaculate condition except the insoles are detached. They are headed to ebay as soon as I truly find out what, exactly they are. $9


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  • Pelennor
    replied


    JPress navy wool duffle coat, found on Ebay for $75, effectively 90% off if you're considering the price of the current model.

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  • jonATL
    replied
    I picked these up from GW without trying them on. No size tags, but looked small enough. Super-duper slim, though, so off to EBay, I guess:

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  • jonATL
    replied
    You're right, buying something super cheap from J Crew is not thrifting.

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  • Nandyn
    replied
    Originally posted by tim_g20t View Post
    I agree that there's a distinction between "thrifting" and "being thrifty." Looking at the post that started this thread...



    ...this sounds to me like he was referring to thrift and consignment stores, and that's how I've always thought of it. I think Nandyn's description is pretty spot on. However, I'm going to take the unpopular position of saying that I'm not sure I agree that TJ Maxx and the like count.

    My worry (a stronger word than probably is warranted) is that once you open up the term "thrifting" to mean a large percentage off retail or typical pricing, it opens this thread up to practically anything one would consider a good deal. Which doesn't seem like the original intent of the thread.
    I only added TJ Maxx and the like since many ebay sellers/stores do the same, buy overstock, unsold merchandise, or orders that were later cancelled or never brought to store, and resell at a much reduced price, but without a physical store like Goodwill or something. But yeah, adding retail stores like TJ Maxx brands does muddy the water a bit.

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  • tim_g20t
    replied
    Originally posted by Nandyn View Post
    I always thought thrifting as being different from being thrifty. Thrifting, to me, is buying second hand (even if it's new with tags), but I do consider pickups at TJ Maxx and the like as thrifting since they are reselling new clothing much the same as many of the bigger eBay shops and whatnot.
    I agree that there's a distinction between "thrifting" and "being thrifty." Looking at the post that started this thread...

    Originally posted by MaxMan View Post
    Hey, Out of my own curiosity, how many of you guys thrift? I'd like to guage the market of savvy well dressed thrifters to see who I'm up against in the thrift market lol...
    ...this sounds to me like he was referring to thrift and consignment stores, and that's how I've always thought of it. I think Nandyn's description is pretty spot on. However, I'm going to take the unpopular position of saying that I'm not sure I agree that TJ Maxx and the like count.

    My worry (a stronger word than probably is warranted) is that once you open up the term "thrifting" to mean a large percentage off retail or typical pricing, it opens this thread up to practically anything one would consider a good deal. Which doesn't seem like the original intent of the thread.

    Leave a comment:


  • Nandyn
    replied
    Originally posted by jonATL View Post
    Apologies, I'm going off the SF definition for their thread, which encompasses Thrift/Consignment/Discount Store. I do think hunting through a retailer's HUGE sale counts because the same thrifting attributes apply: being in the right place at the right time, putting in the time to find a good deal, etc.

    Pretty much all of thrifting boils down to education (knowing what to buy and at what price), attention to detail (the ability to spot hidden damage/know when a garment is close to death and not worth picking up) and timing or the ability to put in the hours.

    I'm anxiously awaiting a Boglioli K Jacket I bought from Saks Off Fifth online for $179. That's thrifting in my book.
    I always thought thrifting as being different from being thrifty. Thrifting, to me, is buying second hand (even if it's new with tags), but I do consider pickups at TJ Maxx and the like as thrifting since they are reselling new clothing much the same as many of the bigger eBay shops and whatnot.

    Leave a comment:


  • jonATL
    replied
    Originally posted by evanparker View Post
    i'm going to go ahead an suggest that on an entire sight seemingly focused on %% off sales from retail stores online, that merely getting something from a %% off sale is probably not thrifting.

    i'm very happy you got something you like! and cheap. awesome.

    buying something from a thrift store is thrifting ;-) ebay is nearly thrifting.


    Apologies, I'm going off the SF definition for their thread, which encompasses Thrift/Consignment/Discount Store. I do think hunting through a retailer's HUGE sale counts because the same thrifting attributes apply: being in the right place at the right time, putting in the time to find a good deal, etc.

    Pretty much all of thrifting boils down to education (knowing what to buy and at what price), attention to detail (the ability to spot hidden damage/know when a garment is close to death and not worth picking up) and timing or the ability to put in the hours.

    I'm anxiously awaiting a Boglioli K Jacket I bought from Saks Off Fifth online for $179. That's thrifting in my book.

    Leave a comment:


  • evanparker
    replied
    i'm going to go ahead an suggest that on an entire sight seemingly focused on %% off sales from retail stores online, that merely getting something from a %% off sale is probably not thrifting.

    i'm very happy you got something you like! and cheap. awesome.

    buying something from a thrift store is thrifting ;-) ebay is nearly thrifting.

    Leave a comment:

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