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    The spirit being for them to sell things they get for free to make money to help people?

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      Yes. The key being the last part of your question: helping people, not making money. I'm not really a fan of people buying surpluses of clothes meant to help the less fortunate (or fiscally savvy) in order to resell the goods for a profit. It just seems wrong to me.


      This isn't meant as an attack or criticism to anyone because I think all of us here recognize the value provided from thrift shops. But to use it solely for personal financial gain? I don't know. I only said it here because these thoughts would likely fall on deaf ears elsewhere and could provide some worthwhile opinions.

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        Thrift stores are in a high-volume low overhead business. They don't have the time or expertise to price things according to real value, and if they did I probably wouldn't shop there, so they wouldn't get my money to help their causes. My local Goodwill has a shop like that where they try to pick out the best stuff and sell it in a boutique setting at higher prices. I don't shop there. I might if I were in a hurry to find a particular thing, but in general it's not worth it.


        In general they're just trying to turn over the stuff they get in as fast as possible to get money to fund their cause. Helping people in need get clothing or goods is a secondary benefit and they certainly don't check my W-2 when I go into the store to buy things. I shop for myself at thrifts, and all of my blazers / sportcoats have come that route. I wouldn't be able to afford to dress as well as I do without thrifting, to be sure. I also flip some things when I find good quality pieces that don't fit me. I usually offer them up as deals to people here first at a lower price than I'd get on eBay because this is a community of guys trying to dress better for less and I'm part of this community.


        You and I will have to agree to disagree on this point. I don't see clothing the less fortunate as a key mission of the thrift stores. They're trying to raise money by selling things donated to them. I'm buying those things and giving them money. Mission accomplished.


        EDIT: Note that at some of the local thrifts they DO price some good pieces higher. I bought several Hickey Freeman suits marked at $30 (although I had a 25% off).

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          @Glen, here's the Maine Hunting boots. Note that one of them has a little green patina on a couple of the eyelets, which should be easy to clean off.











          Here's the Pendleton shirt:




          Here's the Alan Paine shetland wool sweater, it's a bit too big for me:




          To see all of the stuff I picked up yesterday, including a bunch of really nice shirts for someone who fits an XL, see <a href="https://picasaweb.google.com/113945713053434575160/Thrifting?authkey=Gv1sRgCOLihM3S8Puy_wE#5691276589 405397170">

          here</a> Pics 296-308

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            Although I think it's pretty bad for someone to just root through the store looking for stuff to sell to make a quick buck, on some level that is just as good for the charities that a thrift store benefits. Most thrift shops exist primarily to sell stuff, make money, and turn around and use or donate that money for charitable purposes. Salvation Army, Savers, and GoodWill all operate for that reason. Their second purpose is to provide jobs for people who desperately need them (cashiers, stockers, etc). Providing used goods at a discount is really a tertiary purpose.


            From what I've observed, I don't feel like I'm taking anything away from people in need when I shop at thrift stores - I'm looking for leather dress shoes, blazers, and button-downs. Most people who shop at thrift stores out of necessity are looking for children's items, since young children are constantly outgrowing their old clothes, and everyday wear items like jeans, sneakers, winter coats, and so on.

            Ben

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              @Michael Sprague The guy I was going to sell the Vineyard Vines shirt to had to back out, so it's yours if you want it

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                Love the pendleton shirt, how much are you looking for it with shipping?


                Would it be possible to get measurement of the shoulders and length? You can email me if you want mystix @ gmail . com


                I have an address in US and Toronto

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                  @mystix $20 shipped should do it... email me at [email protected]

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                    @Chern In the end, I think the volume (as JC noted) is what the thrift stores thrive on. Even if 10% of their inventory were SF-approved Kitons and Oxxfords that sold out as soon as it hit the rack, I would think it very unlikely that the label and quality of the garment will be significantly more attractive than any other garment for most of their demographic.

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                      Pendleton shirts are made in China now? For some reason I always thought they were made in the USA? I thought about grabbing a NWOT wool made in Scotland blackwatch Pendleton in a medium the other day, but it fit me just a tad too big in the shoulder, and didn't want to bother with flipping it.

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                        I'm guessing the cotton ones are? The wool is probably still make at the Pendleton woolen mills... or at least the fabric is.

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                          Picked up a 32x30 brown Brooks Brothers moleskin trouser. Double-pleated, cuffed if anybody wants.


                          Pretty good condition, although I'd definitely dry clean before wearing (...as I would suggest anybody should for any thrifted article).

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                            And on the anti-flipping note, I think of high quality clothing more as function pieces of art, rather then purely for function. Yes, a pair of Lobbs or EGs will function just fine as a non-clothing enthusiast's daily pair of shoes, but I feel they deserve the care and treatment that are provided by actual clothing enthusiasts to such fine garments. Same goes for Kiton, Oxxford, Brioni, RLPL, Isaia, ect. These are pieces created from artists who have spent years refining their craft, and if they can be found from thrifts and flipped for a bit a cash, and they go to owners who will actually care for the garment and understand and appreciate the quality, I'm all for it.


                            I don't quite understand the mentality that pulling a $300 shirt from a thrift store is somehow putting someone out of a shirt. There are hundreds of perfectly functional shirts at every thrift store I've ever been to, and if someone is pulling the cream of the crop for resale, absolutely no one will go without because of it. That shirt should go to someone who recognizes the value.


                            I may have some bias as I'm also friends with many mid-century modern furniture dealers who find a lot of their items through thrifting, and they feel the same about beautiful pieces of furniture that went to and go to homes without an appreciation for the craftsmanship that went into a lot of the original Eames, Bertoia, and Saarinen. It kills them to see a Broyhill Sculptura that has been painted an ugly gray or to find a Eames lounge with a heinous reupholster job. I'd rather see gorgeous pieces of furniture go to homes that care about them and appreciate the aesthetic then a frat house that needs a living room chair to destroy.

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                              Jason,


                              Sent you an email, I will have to pass, the shirt is too big for me : (

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                                My objection to flipping has little to do with taking clothes that someone less may fortunate may have bought because the turnover is so high and obviously it benefits the stores and those they help - and I doubt the employees care what happens to the goods after they've left the store.


                                I have no problem with trading clothes or selling a few items to people who may have a higher appreciation for them. But to enter a Goodwill where your prevailing mission is to find clothes that you can resell while grabbing anything that looks remotely valuable? Nah, I don't agree with that at all.

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