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    Been thrifting for a while, partly inspired by this thread, so may as well contribute -

    Thursday picked up a pair of Allen Edmonds from Goodwill (Fairmont from the discontinued Corporate Casuals line - orthotic insole, vibram outsole). I needed a brown blucher, but not sure if they fit well enough. As purchased:
    http://i791.photobucket.com/albums/y...ps7f9321ae.jpg
    After cleaning & polish:
    http://i791.photobucket.com/albums/y...ps1ec3ed04.jpg

    Today went to the only consignment shop in the city that has ANY menswear, found a vintage Harris Tweed coat (which fits, but may try to flip anyway; not sure I'll really have any opportunity to wear it):
    http://i791.photobucket.com/albums/y...ps25b9d7ac.jpg
    http://i791.photobucket.com/albums/y...psf47bda89.jpg

    Comment


      ^^^ nice finds! In six months of very regular thrifting, I've found exactly two pairs of shoes that fit me.

      I got around to listing three pairs of the deadstock 501s on eBay - the little 'e' selvedge pair are doing quite well.

      http://www.ebay.com/itm/301058592248...84.m1555.l2649

      http://www.ebay.com/itm/301058609321...84.m1555.l2649

      http://www.ebay.com/itm/301058615645...84.m1555.l2649

      I still haven't decided what I'm going to do with the big 'E' pair.

      Comment


        I did some research on the dinner jacket:


        Measurements:
        P2p: 22
        Sleeve: 25.5
        Shoulder: 16.5!
        Length: 28.25





        John Kellogg was destined to be a well-off man from birth. He was born in upstate New York in 1876 to a second-generation linseed oil baron and grew up a significant, but tasteful family mansion built in the 1850s.

        He followed his father and grandfather into the family business, appearing through the years in the census for his hometown, Amsterdam, NY, which is located upstate, just to the northwest of Albany.

        Ann Peconie, executive director of the city’s museum, said when Kellog was head of the “quite regal” he was stand at the cupola atop the house “where it is said Mr. Kellogg watched barges come up the Mohawk delivering to him barrels of linseed to make his oil products.”

        In 1930, Kellogg decided he needed a bespoke dinner jacket, so he walked down to Church Street and visited Mr. Brown, a merchant tailor who had first opened up shop in the city around 1908 over the Solvos confectionary store on East Main. He had moved to the city from Canada, where he had started his lifetime in clothes as a 13-year-old apprentice. He was to retire in 1944, nearly 15 years after opening his own shop in Amsterdam, having spent 39 years making clothes for Amsterdam residents at three different locations, but in 1930, he was likely riding high from his recent relocation to a larger space (and a move away from Railroad Street). He died in 1952 after what the Amsterdam Evening Recorder called “a long illness.”

        Kellogg's jacket, made for him in September of 1930, has an incredible backstory; and for being more than 80 years old, it is in fantastic condition. Kellogg must not have worn this very often, and I don't know how it was stored, but it must have been packed away very carefully.

        Comment


          how in the heck did you find all that out?

          Originally posted by jonATL View Post
          I did some research on the dinner jacket:


          Measurements:
          P2p: 22
          Sleeve: 25.5
          Shoulder: 16.5!
          Length: 28.25





          John Kellogg was destined to be a well-off man from birth. He was born in upstate New York in 1876 to a second-generation linseed oil baron and grew up a significant, but tasteful family mansion built in the 1850s.

          He followed his father and grandfather into the family business, appearing through the years in the census for his hometown, Amsterdam, NY, which is located upstate, just to the northwest of Albany.

          Ann Peconie, executive director of the city’s museum, said when Kellog was head of the “quite regal” he was stand at the cupola atop the house “where it is said Mr. Kellogg watched barges come up the Mohawk delivering to him barrels of linseed to make his oil products.”

          In 1930, Kellogg decided he needed a bespoke dinner jacket, so he walked down to Church Street and visited Mr. Brown, a merchant tailor who had first opened up shop in the city around 1908 over the Solvos confectionary store on East Main. He had moved to the city from Canada, where he had started his lifetime in clothes as a 13-year-old apprentice. He was to retire in 1944, nearly 15 years after opening his own shop in Amsterdam, having spent 39 years making clothes for Amsterdam residents at three different locations, but in 1930, he was likely riding high from his recent relocation to a larger space (and a move away from Railroad Street). He died in 1952 after what the Amsterdam Evening Recorder called “a long illness.”

          Kellogg's jacket, made for him in September of 1930, has an incredible backstory; and for being more than 80 years old, it is in fantastic condition. Kellogg must not have worn this very often, and I don't know how it was stored, but it must have been packed away very carefully.

          Comment


            Mostly fultonhistory.com, which has a vast archive of papers from the time period. I also googled the guy, which is where I found a link to their house on the market (http://www.uslister.com/listings/pro.../21562333.html).

            Here's a link to the 1944 paper that includes a notice of the tailor retiring: http://fultonhistory.com/Newspaper4/...20-%200361.pdf
            (I also found his obit from 8 years later)

            Comment


              Originally posted by jonATL View Post
              Mostly fultonhistory.com, which has a vast archive of papers from the time period. I also googled the guy, which is where I found a link to their house on the market (http://www.uslister.com/listings/pro.../21562333.html).

              Here's a link to the 1944 paper that includes a notice of the tailor retiring: http://fultonhistory.com/Newspaper4/...20-%200361.pdf
              (I also found his obit from 8 years later)
              That's wild! Thrifting is a great hobby.

              Comment


                WHAMMY!

                Comment


                  Nice jacket, what thrift store in Atlanta did you find it?

                  Comment


                    Goodwill ...

                    Comment


                      That jacket is an awesome find. Unfortunately, I'd be boo-ed out of my office in NY if I was caught wearing that.

                      Had a productive weekend in NYC.
                      -2 Ferragamo ties

                      -1 Paul Stuart flannel button down
                      -Cashmere hoodie
                      -Valentino overcoat that fits the girlfriend like a glove

                      Comment


                        Looks like it is for zipping in a life jacket or a tackle vest.

                        Comment


                          ^^ thanks!

                          Comment


                            Originally posted by jonATL View Post
                            WHAMMY!

                            damn what a find. how much was it?

                            Comment


                              I had a great thrifting trip today. Everything fits but i'll need to have the coat taken in.

                              Alden for J. Crew unlined suede bluchers in great shape (barely worn) for $45

                              http://www.flickr.com/photos/9055868...7639903291593/
                              http://www.flickr.com/photos/9055868...7639903291593/

                              Burberry tan raincoat in perfect condition $35

                              http://www.flickr.com/photos/9055868...7639903291593/
                              http://www.flickr.com/photos/9055868...7639903291593/

                              Comment


                                Man great find on those Aldens.

                                Comment

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