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Clothing for a software internship interview

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  • thmage
    replied


    Had the interview today. I ended up going with the full suit thanks to your advice. It was definitely more than necessary (they were very much a T-shirt culture), but it did get the (positive) attention of the tech lead interviewing me. The interview itself went alright, I'll hear back soon.

    Thanks again for the advice.

    Leave a comment:


  • jason_carreira
    replied


    The shoes need a shine at least

    Leave a comment:


  • nicholascrawford
    replied


    I like wearing my best clothes on the plane. Makes packing pretty simple.

    Leave a comment:


  • bruschetta
    replied


    thmage, the shirt looks fine under the suit. Wear it, and don't worry about it. The shoes are hideous, but it's likely that no one will notice.


    Packing a suit for a carry-on is very easy. You can search YouTube for a guide on how this is done. You can also pack a suit for a checked bag - this is even easier.

    Leave a comment:


  • thmage
    replied


    Just tried it on, and it's actually not as bad as I was thinking. Still not slim, but I'm not swimming in extra fabric either.









    And my suit jacket, not a great fit either.






    Also, thoughts on these shoes? They're nothing special, but are they terrible?




    So the question, is the suit worth wearing tomorrow to bring back on my flight?

    Leave a comment:


  • thmage
    replied


    Thanks guys. I think I'll use this as an opportunity to get a few new clothes once I get home. I'll have to stop at the stores and see what works, but I'll probably go for a new slim-fit dress shirt, a sweater, and perhaps a blazer. I'll let you know how it goes.

    Leave a comment:


  • BenC
    replied


    While jacketless tie look maybe what 9 year olds wear to weddings, you are applying for an IT job we are not a group known for our fashion sense or our social skills or hygiene. Early in my career, I would never show up for an interview without a suit. That was a while ago when business casual was, where I worked atleast, the jacketless tie look. Last summer, I got by with wearing cargo pants and hawaiian shirts as business casual. If you already have a suit that fits well, that would be fine. If you don't, going jacketless tie is not a bad thing. You won't score points at dappered, but in an IT shop you will not be under dressed. I would echo JC sentiment on getting a well fitted shirt. They make all the difference in the world. The sloppy garbage bag around the middle look of a regular fit dress shirt on most people diminishes any competitive advantage of being "dressed up." Fitting properly trumps the more formal attire most times. If you are going to forgo the jacket, I would go for the dressier slacks(hopefully flat front). If I were in your situation, I would shoot for (in order)

    1) A well fitted shirt(minimal extra material)

    2) Decent slacks(don't have cell phone and wallet bulges)

    3) Tie

    4) Serviceable Shoes

    5) Blazer


    And good luck with your interview. Let us know how it turns out. Sounds like their are more than a few IT people here that can offer some insights.

    Leave a comment:


  • LesserBlackDog
    replied


    Personally, I'd go for a blazer, tie, and nice slacks. It shows respect and professionalism without making you look like you ran out just to buy an interview suit. If you've got a suit that fits perfectly, though, you could do that as well.

    Leave a comment:


  • CJJ
    replied


    I agree with Alan on the jacketless tie look. I read somewhere that tie, shirt and no jackets was what a nine-year old wears to a wedding. As others have mentioned a v-neck or blazer would tighten up the look and alleviate the ill fitting shirt.


    I work in the waste industry and when a guy shows up for a "helper" position ( which is the entry level position and they basically setting up trash cans so the driver can dump them) in a jacket or suit, the HR manager notices. Stand out from the crowd is what I say.

    Leave a comment:


  • nicholascrawford
    replied


    A grey sweater works with a lot of different shirt/tie combos. I have a 100% merino wool Merona sweater from Target that was $30. Just keep it out of the wash machine (hand wash when necessary), and it's a great option.

    Leave a comment:


  • thmage
    replied


    Thanks for the comments guys! The company is a small start-up, so it doesn't have the Fortune 500 culture you guys mentioned. I'll be doing the interview at their office during my spring break. And since I don't have a garment bag, a full suit won't be possible. (hmm, unless I wore it on the plane. I guess that's a possibility)

    And looking at the 10-day forecast, it's supposed to be rainy on that day, so I'll probably stop at the store and pick up an extra layer. I've been wanting a good V-neck sweater or perhaps a blazer, so I'll try to find something else.


    So I think I'll bring the shirt and tie with me, but I'll go to the store and find something else to pull it together.

    Leave a comment:


  • Chareth
    replied


    Alan, I'm lucky I haven't been put in that position before.


    Sounds like the best thing to do is to ask your headhunter, or your HR contact/corporate recruiter at the firm where you're interviewing what would be appropriate before going in.

    Leave a comment:


  • alan
    replied


    @Chareth: One time, I had an interview where the company specifically requested me to show up casually, but my headhunter forgot to relay the message. I showed up in my suit as usual. I could tell they were uncomfortable with it, and that made me uncomfortable. I didn't get that job. I'll never know precisely why I didn't get it, but surely the suit was working against me that time.

    Leave a comment:


  • jason_carreira
    replied


    Directly because they were wearing a suit? No. Because they seemed nervous and uncomfortable? Yes.


    It depends on what kind of organization it is. Big Fortune 500 companies hire software engineers, but the culture there is very different from software companies like I've worked for. It also depends on who you're interviewing with. I've got a candidate coming in on Friday and they're meeting with our director of development, myself, and a couple other developers here. If they pass that hurdle then they'll meet with our CEO (but I dress up more than he does).


    If you have a suit that fits well and you feel comfortable in it, then by all means wear it. If it doesn't fit well or you would feel uncomfortable or fidgety in it, then skip it unless it's a conservative environment.


    Like I said before, I spent 2 years at my current job wearing jeans every day with the same pair of beat up old Keens, so the bar is pretty low here.

    Leave a comment:


  • Chareth
    replied


    Has anyone here seen someone not get a job because they wore a suit and the interviewer thought they were overdressed?

    Leave a comment:

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