Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Pea coat fabrics

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Pea coat fabrics

    I picked up a Dock pea coat at J Crew the other day and was surprised by the fabric. It was a very rough wool. It felt a lot like Gap's duffel coat, actually (which was so rough it itched through my shirt). My wife's pea coat is much softer, but turns out to be a cashmere blend. My current pea coat is also quite a bit softer than the Dock coat, but I believe has a bit more synthetic in the blend. It's also not as thick a weave.

    Anyway, I'm wondering what others' pea coat fabrics are like. Are they generally rough (seems appropriate for authenticity, maybe), or are they a bit more refined? Should I expect most non-cashmere pea coats to feel like the Dock coat? What's that Bond pea coat like?

    #2
    There are non-cashmere peacoats that have a softer handfeel. I have an older one from Express that's soft. Last year's peacoat from Combat Gent is also very soft. It depends on the wool and if there are other materials. Synthetic fibers can create a softer feel.

    Comment


      #3
      I have not owned another peacoat to compare, but I own the Bond peacoat. I think the fabric is somewhat thick and rigid (for wool), but not rough at all. It is not as smooth as J.Crew's topcoats from this season, but not at all scratchy like lambswool. It is 80% wool/20% nylon.

      Not sure if that will really help you to determine, I think the best way is just to feel other fabrics in store. Now I'm curious to feel the dock peacoat myself.

      Comment


        #4
        Traditionally, pea coats are made from heavy melton, which is naturally rougher, but great at keeping the heat locked in. Originally, made from 100% Wool, now are more commonly blended with nylon for added strength. 32 oz melton is the warmest, while others use a lighter 24 oz variant to keep the price down and suitable for most daily wearers.

        Remember, traditionally, pea coats were utilitarian, military coats, not luxury items.

        Comment


          #5
          I have an old Bayswater, which the Dock replaced, and the wool is the same. It's super warm and has held up very well.

          SpierMackay nailed it.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by dpark View Post
            I picked up a Dock pea coat at J Crew the other day and was surprised by the fabric. It was a very rough wool. It felt a lot like Gap's duffel coat, actually (which was so rough it itched through my shirt). My wife's pea coat is much softer, but turns out to be a cashmere blend. My current pea coat is also quite a bit softer than the Dock coat, but I believe has a bit more synthetic in the blend. It's also not as thick a weave.

            Anyway, I'm wondering what others' pea coat fabrics are like. Are they generally rough (seems appropriate for authenticity, maybe), or are they a bit more refined? Should I expect most non-cashmere pea coats to feel like the Dock coat? What's that Bond pea coat like?
            Cashmere blend is designer

            From my reading wool blend is more for function, I bought a 32Oz Melton bridge coat, it's %80 wool then %15 Poly and %5 nylon (I think) it went to tailor instantly. My understanding is that poly helps add strength to material, retain heat and help repel water.

            I have a Schott pea coat coming as well, will be able to compare them soon as I believe they are %100 wool

            Comment


              #7
              Thanks. I was just surprised by how rough (maybe coarse is a better word) the Dock coat felt, especially because it is so highly recommended. I wasn't sure if this was the expectation for a pea coat and the fabric is supposed to have a rough handfeel. Sounds like that's common/traditional but not necessarily the case.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by SpierMackay View Post
                Traditionally, pea coats are made from heavy melton, which is naturally rougher, but great at keeping the heat locked in. Originally, made from 100% Wool, now are more commonly blended with nylon for added strength.

                I feel like the wool+nylon also results in a much better fiber performance when wet.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by dpark View Post
                  Thanks. I was just surprised by how rough (maybe coarse is a better word) the Dock coat felt, especially because it is so highly recommended. I wasn't sure if this was the expectation for a pea coat and the fabric is supposed to have a rough handfeel. Sounds like that's common/traditional but not necessarily the case.
                  I also was not pleased with the fabric on the j crew one. Even for a peacoat, it just didn't look good it was so rough. I ordered several of the ones on sale at nordstrom over the weekend. Hopefully I will like one of them.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    [MENTION=12087]SpierMackay[/MENTION] please make a pea coat and take my money.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I own the Dock peacoat, and I would advise you to give it some time to break in- minimum 25-30 wears before it gets "comfy". The fabric is not luxurious, but honestly the texture it is more true to the heritage and function of the peacoat than all the blends you see from most retailers. I love putting mine on and having it feel invincible- just strong built to last fabric. It is beefy and will stand up to wind, cold, and weather.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        25 to 30 wears for break in is unlikely. I have one of these on the way (ordered before I happened across it in store and was too late to cancel), and I'll try it on again when it arrives, but I'm not keeping a coat I don't like in the hopes it ends up nice. That has never worked out for me with any article of clothing. I either like it when I put it on, return it, or regret it later.

                        I also don't really need a new coat so cannot justify keeping a coat I don't love.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by SpierMackay View Post
                          Traditionally, pea coats are made from heavy melton, which is naturally rougher, but great at keeping the heat locked in. Originally, made from 100% Wool, now are more commonly blended with nylon for added strength. 32 oz melton is the warmest, while others use a lighter 24 oz variant to keep the price down and suitable for most daily wearers.

                          Remember, traditionally, pea coats were utilitarian, military coats, not luxury items.
                          I'm pretty sure my Schott Pea Coat is this. Anything 100% wool of some sort is going to be warm. Pea Coats are great because they are warm as hell and look good. It's not going to look as good as a topcoat but it's the next outerwear step down. I go wool from Oct-Mar.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            I feel like if anyone wans something sorta formal, get a car or top coat. Even a pea-coat-themed topcoat maybe. They usually have softer and thinner wool, or the good cashmere blends.

                            if you want something decidedly casual, get the peacoat. The pea coat is superb, but its never as formal or as sharp as I wish it was. A good peacoat will not usually have soft fabric. It will be utilitarian, and brilliant in it's general rough and boxyness.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              At the risk of repeating everything that everyone else has already said, peacoats are designed to be rugged and utilitarian and to protect the wearer from the elements - cold, wind, water. A coat with a rough, heavy wool exterior is about as effective at that as anything, especially in the pre-synthetics world in which peacoats first came about.

                              Surviving the elements isn't as important to most folks today, when most of us spend winter hopping from one heated interior space to another - not hanging onto sail rigging in freezing sea spray for sixteen hours at a time.

                              A soft cashmere, merino, or synthetic blend coat might be more desirable for most people for its superior hand-feel, but such coats are more for fashion/luxury and less for utility.

                              TL;DR, there is nothing wrong, and in fact there is something historically right, about a peacoat in a rough wool material.
                              Ben

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X