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Mission Belt - Any Good?

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    Mission Belt - Any Good?

    Does anyone have any experience with a Mission Belt belt? I saw them on a recent Shark Tank episode, but they're an online only store so there's nowhere to check one out in person. I need a new brown belt, and I was thinking about getting this one. If anyone has any advice, I'd appreciate it. Thanks.

    #2
    Ratchet belts work fine in a casual context. They're not really a new thing, but they're pretty convenient if your weight fluctuates. As a side note, you can also remove and re-attach the buckle of the belt from the tail rather easily, so you can buy a replacement tail or get a second colour of leather later on without changing buckles.

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      #3
      Mission belts are good, but the best ratcheting belt is Eazy Belt. The latch mechanism for releasing the belt makes a lot more sense, and the quality of the belt itself is a lot superior. Also, Eazy can send you a long length belt strap, with instructions for cutting it to size to perfectly fit you if you'd like. I use both my Mission and Eazy, but prefer the easy a lot more.

      Also...don't wear with anything really nice. I use my eazy for everyday belt wearing - but not with a more dressy outfit - it just looks cheap and unstylish in that setting.

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        #4
        Trakline belt are best

        Our company makes the popular Trakline belt that's sold over $500,000 worth on Kickstarter alone this past year and a half. We started several years ago when we redesigned the ratchet buckle mechanism to make it sleeker and more reliable than the function Mission belt uses. Then we redid all the buckle faces to make them modern and stylish. Mission uses one buckle face - solid - in different colors and a very low-grade leather. Eazy buckles have a different look altogether and use inexpensive leather, that's why you suggested there not suited for dress situations. We decided to use only full-grain (best quality) leather, so you can wear your Trakline belt with jeans or a suit. See the entire collection at http://www.KoreEssentials.com


        Originally posted by bviaallison View Post
        Mission belts are good, but the best ratcheting belt is Eazy Belt. The latch mechanism for releasing the belt makes a lot more sense, and the quality of the belt itself is a lot superior. Also, Eazy can send you a long length belt strap, with instructions for cutting it to size to perfectly fit you if you'd like. I use both my Mission and Eazy, but prefer the easy a lot more.

        Also...don't wear with anything really nice. I use my eazy for everyday belt wearing - but not with a more dressy outfit - it just looks cheap and unstylish in that setting.

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          #5
          [MENTION=13444]Karl Kozak[/MENTION] Welcome to the Dapper Community, oh KoreEssentials ambassador. Always good to hear from brand representatives!

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            #6
            Originally posted by Karl Kozak View Post
            Our company makes the popular Trakline belt that's sold over $500,000 worth on Kickstarter alone this past year and a half. We started several years ago when we redesigned the ratchet buckle mechanism to make it sleeker and more reliable than the function Mission belt uses. Then we redid all the buckle faces to make them modern and stylish. Mission uses one buckle face - solid - in different colors and a very low-grade leather. Eazy buckles have a different look altogether and use inexpensive leather, that's why you suggested there not suited for dress situations. We decided to use only full-grain (best quality) leather, so you can wear your Trakline belt with jeans or a suit. See the entire collection at http://www.KoreEssentials.com
            Having not seen Trakline before, or tested it, I can't speak to the quality of the leather in the belt. I may have misspoken in using the word "stylish" before. It would be more appropriate to say that, currently, ratcheting belts are not of proper form, in my opinion, to be worn in a more dressed up environment (full suit environment, wedding, etc.). They are fine for everyday business casual down to casual - but the buckle is just too bulky (again, in my opinion) for a more formal event. I'm wearing a ratcheting belt as I type this, so I'm by no means discounting the usefulness of the belt....there's just a time and a place for everything. And as with everything in the style world, universal will always be beaten by custom fit for look.

            Comment


              #7
              Seems a bit gimmicky to me. I don't see any functional difference between this and the Hickok, and Giant Grip buckles dating back to the 1920s. Far from being an improvement on holes, all that track does is make the belt buckle useless with anything but a specialized belt.

              I got this Giant Grip buckle from the 1920s off ebay for $15, added a $10 1" belt blank and dyed it the color I wanted it.


              I never noticed, or payed much attention to this style of belt until recently, but when I started looking I discovered these buckles are plentiful, having been made from the 1920s-1960s, and if you want a new one, J.crew has one, and J.crew factrory also has a less expensive version. I don't know about the new ones, but the old ones work fine with friction. No track needed.
              Last edited by mattface; February 17, 2015, 09:09 AM.

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                #8
                Track styles buckles were first introduced about 2 decades ago in Asian and have become very popular there. Several small US companies like SlideBelt began importing them about 8 years ago. They merely shipped them to the US, imprinted their logo on the buckle face and then resold them. Mission belt (owner is a cousin to the SlideBelt founder, who claims he ripped him off of his idea) is the latest company to do just that, import, stamp, resell. Their popularity is only thanks to their Shark Tank appearance. I first saw these Asian buckles almost 4 years ago and decided that the track was great for providing a perfect, secure fit - BUT the Asian designed buckles were far too bulky and gimmicky for my tastes. They use a magnetic mechanism, that needs lots of metal on the backside to make it all work. So I set out to revamp the entire mechanism and create new faces for US consumption. I ended up replacing the magnet with a sleek and slim spring-caliper. It cut out most of the metal and gave Trakline Belts the ability to offer a myriad of unique buckle faces. So unlike the others, Trakline belt created custom product molds and one-of-a-kind designs. Mission belt offers only a solid face buckle. As a result, many of our customers purchase Trakline belts for dress as well as casual, although everyone has their own idea of what "dressed up" means. I find that the Mission belts look very casual and to a large extent juvenile, with all the red, blue and yellow belts to compensate. As far as quality is concerned Trakline Belts use only full-grain leather and our most popular buckles are solid stainless steel. But you can see for yourself at -- http://www.KoreEssentails.com

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by mattface View Post
                  Seems a bit gimmicky to me. I don't see any functional difference between this and the Hickok, and Giant Grip buckles dating back to the 1920s. Far from being an improvement on holes, all that track does is make the belt buckle useless with anything but a specialized belt.

                  I got this Giant Grip buckle from the 1920s off ebay for $15, added a $10 1" belt blank and dyed it the color I wanted it.


                  I never noticed, or payed much attention to this style of belt until recently, but when I started looking I discovered these buckles are plentiful, having been made from the 1920s-1960s, and if you want a new one, J.crew has one, and J.crew factrory also has a less expensive version. I don't know about the new ones, but the old ones work fine with friction. No track needed.
                  Yes, I have tried these belts before and although they look nice and I enjoy wearing them occasionally - they slip during the day and don't provide the secure fit a Trakline belt does. And yes, although a ratchet buckle is only good with a track style belt - so are the grip buckles. Actually you can swap out buckles and belts easily on a ratchet belt. But -- this thread is more on the topic of ratchet belts... I suggest you give one a try prior to commenting.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Karl Kozak View Post
                    Yes, I have tried these belts before and although they look nice and I enjoy wearing them occasionally - they slip during the day and don't provide the secure fit a Trakline belt does. And yes, although a ratchet buckle is only good with a track style belt - so are the grip buckles. Actually you can swap out buckles and belts easily on a ratchet belt. But -- this thread is more on the topic of ratchet belts... I suggest you give one a try prior to commenting.
                    Mine doesn't slip at all, and the only thing specialized about the belt is that I didn't punch any holes in it, though it should work fine on any 1" leather belt holes or no. I don't think not having tried a track belt negates my experience that the Giant Grip is a reasonable alternative. I get that you've got a vested interest in demonstrating the superiority of your product, but I don't feel I need to try your product to support my opinion that it is a solution in need of a problem. I have no problem with conventional belts. Thus I see no need for a complicated solution to a simple problem. I also see no need to check with you before posting that opinion, but thanks for the "suggestion", I'll file it in the circular cabinet under "vested interest".

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I'm not saying our Trakline ratchet belt is superior to a "Giant Grip" belt, which you seem to be somewhat vested in... I'm just saying that ratchet belts have a few advantages over regular belts - they give a precise, secure fit and you can change out buckles and leathers. I also understand that you don't agree with that - but you've never tried a ratchet belt. I have owned and worn a grip belt before - and they slip over the course of a day, if you do anything besides stand still. But you have all the right to your opinion, as do I. I'll file yours under "off track", as this thread was begun around ratchet belts. Since I am vested - here's another shameless plug... our customers love our belts and you can see the collection at http://www.KoreEssentials.com or at Amazon.com

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by Karl Kozak View Post
                        I'm not saying our Trakline ratchet belt is superior to a "Giant Grip" belt, which you seem to be somewhat vested in... I'm just saying that ratchet belts have a few advantages over regular belts - they give a precise, secure fit and you can change out buckles and leathers. I also understand that you don't agree with that - but you've never tried a ratchet belt. I have owned and worn a grip belt before - and they slip over the course of a day, if you do anything besides stand still. But you have all the right to your opinion, as do I.
                        I walk several miles a day. it's a mile each way to the bus, and I am up and down all day at work. Today I ran a quarter mile, between buildings just because it was too damned cold to walk. I frequently lift 50 pound objects in the course of my normal life. When stacking pellets I will carry 50 40 pound bags down the basement stairs in the course of a couple hours. So I wouldn't say I just stand still, I'm confident in saying that my belt does not slip. Precise secure fit? Check! Are all grip belts equal? Probably not, but mine works fine.

                        I have 2 different buckles which I can easily switch out onto the belt I have, a generic 1" belt blank which I bought for $10 from a leather supplier and dyed to my taste. I could also put either of these buckles or any of the hundreds of other interesting buckles I see at antique stores and on ebay and etsy for $5-$15 on any standard 1" leather belt, or even a 1.25" belt if I modify the buckle end slightly. Change out buckles and leathers? Check.

                        I understand you feel your product offers some advantages over regular belts, but I don't actually see anything lacking in conventional belts. In my 44 years of doing a great deal more than standing still I have never had a conventional belt of any kind fail in any way, and I have some belts that I've worn regularly for over 20 years. I have some vintage ones that are likely older than I am. If it is "misguided" to think that a simple device that works perfectly 100 percent of the time for decades on end is not in need of improvement, then I shall remain blissfully ignorant.

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                          #13
                          This all got WAY less than interesting in a hurry. I've deleted the off-topic posts and left what I consider the useful, on-topic ones, without deleting the less useful material within them; I'm trying to err on the side of leaving posts alone, while not letting things devolve into pure argument. If you have an issue with any of the above, PM me. Thanks.

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                            #14
                            Mission Belts are poor quality belts. I purchased 2 and both broke. Contacting Mission customer service was a waste of time — they accused me of being a scammer.

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                              #15
                              UPDATE - BROKEN MISSION BELTS
                              I purchased 2 Mission Belts. Both broke through normal use. The buckle fell apart on one. The belt on the other wore away making it unwearable. Mission makes their belts in China and apparently they have a synthetic lining and are not genuine leather. I didn’t know about their 1-year warranty. Both belts broke within the first year. I recently contacted Mission. With every email, I received a reply from different person. Very annoying re: continuity. They required pictures as proof, which I understand. My original belt was thrown out a while ago, so I couldn’t send a photo. They likened me to a scammer. Wow! So I was going nowhere with that broken belt. The second belt took me some time to dig up a photo — when I sent it to them, the warranty had expired days before. They were not willing to honor the warranty. A manager also doubled down on the decision to not honor the warranty — they have a no exception policy!! Wow! Poor policy. Terrible customer service. And poor quality belts to begin with. My mistake was buying from Mission Belts in the first place. On the official company chat, I asked Mission client support person (Kim) if, as a consumer, she felt the company’s decision was fair — she very rudely said, and I quote, “I know who you are” and refused to reply. Would not answer my questions any further. Brutal customer service! As a paying customer having 2 bad experiences, I cannot recommend Mission Belts.

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