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so what exactly is thinsulate...?

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    so what exactly is thinsulate...?

    Is it recommended for j crew topcoat/peacosts? Do I need it in nor cal?

    #2
    Ive had both thinsulate and nonthinsulate peacoats from J Crew and I cant remember it making much of a difference. Both were sufficient for above freezing temps without needing warm base layers.

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      #3
      Originally posted by Scofield View Post
      Is it recommended for j crew topcoat/peacosts? Do I need it in nor cal?
      Thinsulate is a thin layer of insulation -- basically polyester matting. With polyester being very fine, it traps more air in the same thickness of material than traditional textiles. It falls down on other properties, such as wool's ability to retain heat when wet, but it is also cost effective and doesn't easily clump.

      Having it in the lining will add some warmth, but it's not intended for true cold-weather gear. Think of it as akin to a built-in sweater layer.

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        #4
        I have it in my Dock peacoat and I find it pretty comfy and warm. I can walk out in 30's weather with a tshirt underneath and won't get cold. Also very soft and comfortable.

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          #5
          I have it in the Dock Peacoat. It's a VERY warm coat. I'll definitely be looking for something between this (20-50* weather) and the slightly warmer window. Shame too, it's such an attractive piece I could wear it nearly full time.

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            #6
            Originally posted by Galcobar View Post
            Thinsulate is a thin layer of insulation -- basically polyester matting. With polyester being very fine, it traps more air in the same thickness of material than traditional textiles. It falls down on other properties, such as wool's ability to retain heat when wet, but it is also cost effective and doesn't easily clump.

            Having it in the lining will add some warmth, but it's not intended for true cold-weather gear. Think of it as akin to a built-in sweater layer.
            Polypropylene or Polyethylene actually. Functionally its very similar to a quilted nylon lining or polyester, but because its so warm for its given volume, it lets them reduce bulk.

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              #7
              The Wikipedia article is poorly written; Thinsulate uses unusual polyesters, but still polyester. Polyethylene is a form of polyester; the textile people call polyester is a polyethelene.

              3M -the trademark-holder for Thinsulate- states that most versions of Thinsulate are polyester-based, usually mixed with an olefin fabric.

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                #8
                to answer the second part of your question, I don't think you will need thinsulate if you live in Norcal, haha

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by jayashae View Post
                  to answer the second part of your question, I don't think you will need thinsulate if you live in Norcal, haha
                  seems as if they dont make the peacoats without thinsulate....

                  i have a black peacoat from express that's p good, and a black cotton peacoat from express thats p good for fall/spring (bought em pre dappered days but they fit well/look good)

                  which one of these j crew options should i buy with the 40% discount (all in navy)? (i guess i dont really NEED any of them)

                  https://www.jcrew.com/browse/single_...E&bmUID=kFiwSi.

                  navy

                  https://www.jcrew.com/browse/single_...&bmUID=kFiwSiX

                  https://www.jcrew.com/browse/single_...&bmUID=kFiwSjb

                  heather naval blue

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                    #10
                    I got error pages from all the links

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                      #12
                      Whether one needs thinsulate depends on what the rest of the garment is made of. Thinsulate as it has already been said has the advantages of thinness and economy. Presumably, if the regular version is identical, it won't offer as much warmth. If it doesn't get too cold where you are, I suggest the regular, and if that is not enough you can always layer. It can be more versatile, because you can wear it without layers in warmer weather.

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                        #13
                        I have the J. Crew "uninsulated" Dock peacoat. It is really thick, with a quilted lining, and would keep me warm in anything short of a Chicago blizzard. Don't fear the plain (no Thinsulate) version, if they still have it.

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                          #14
                          I just bought the Ludlow naval blue. I went with the thinsulate bc it gets very cold where I live (Chicago). When i get it, i can let you know how warm it is. I ordered the Jcrew Peacoat with thinsulate before returning it but that thing was super warm. Anything over 50 would make you feel hot.

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                            #15
                            I have the Dock Peacoat with Thinsulate, and living in DC, it can go from 70 degrees to 30 degrees in a hurry. I always keep it in the car because I never know when I'll need it, but when weather dropped to 30s, I was definitely warm and toasty in it, and it was definitely way too hot to wear it when temps approached 50s.

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