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    Originally posted by phatte View Post
    I'm going to purchase a bow tie for an event, and as I have very few times I might ever need it, I'm just going cheap with Tie Bar. What's the difference between a "self-tie" and "pre-tied"? Would the pre-tied be noticeable? Is it like a clip on? On the other hand... is it really that hard to tie a bow tie that they need to offer this pre-tied option?
    Up until this summer I had no idea how to tie a bow tie. Bought one because I wanted to learn. Watched a youtube video and practiced a few times before needing to actually wear it. Was pretty easy to learn how to tie it.

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      Originally posted by phatte View Post
      I'm going to purchase a bow tie for an event, and as I have very few times I might ever need it, I'm just going cheap with Tie Bar. What's the difference between a "self-tie" and "pre-tied"? Would the pre-tied be noticeable? Is it like a clip on? On the other hand... is it really that hard to tie a bow tie that they need to offer this pre-tied option?
      Always go with self-tie. Practice tying the tie well in advance of when you need to wear it. It will take you a few tries to get used to it. Bow ties are easier to tie then regular ties since there is only one knot you need to remember. They offer pretied bow ties for the same reason you can find pretied regular ties...some people don't care and/or are lazy.

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        I get confused when websites have waist measurements for their shirts. I assume that would be one that's usually measured near your belly button. However even with sizes like Charles Tyrwhitt's "extra slim fit" shirts the waist measurement seems to be way too high. I have never ordered a shirt online and am not sure if I can get it to fit (I will probably end up bringing it to a tailor) but I'd want the shirt to be close to fitting so it will be a small adjustment.

        If this helps:
        Height: 6'1
        Chest: 38
        Sleeve: 33 1/2
        Waist: 32

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          Originally posted by phatte View Post
          Thanks! That picture reminded me that bow ties look great untied. I think I'll give it a try.
          Just search YouTube for how to tie a bow tie - there are tons. I learned from watching this guy: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OoUre0ugkmI

          And yes, in addition to having a bit of sprezz with a not-perfectly-tied bow tie (it shouldn't look like crap, but it should have some character as opposed to the pre-tied options), the benefit of a bow tie (particularly black tie) is the ability to let it hang untied at the end of the night. The dudes with pre-tied ones will be looking on jealously at your awesomeness with their pre-tied stuffed in a pocket and their tie-less open collars (lame).

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            Originally posted by ISN View Post
            I get confused when websites have waist measurements for their shirts. I assume that would be one that's usually measured near your belly button. However even with sizes like Charles Tyrwhitt's "extra slim fit" shirts the waist measurement seems to be way too high. I have never ordered a shirt online and am not sure if I can get it to fit (I will probably end up bringing it to a tailor) but I'd want the shirt to be close to fitting so it will be a small adjustment.

            If this helps:
            Height: 6'1
            Chest: 38
            Sleeve: 33 1/2
            Waist: 32
            Yeah, I don't know what's up with those measurements. I can tell you that the CT extra slim fit is a good fit for me, even though the waist measurement listed for my size is 40.6 inches and my pants waist size is 33. The shirt could maybe be a tad slimmer, but nothing like that difference would imply.

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              Originally posted by ELNJ View Post
              Yeah, I don't know what's up with those measurements. I can tell you that the CT extra slim fit is a good fit for me, even though the waist measurement listed for my size is 40.6 inches and my pants waist size is 33. The shirt could maybe be a tad slimmer, but nothing like that difference would imply.
              That makes a lot more sense, I'm probably gonna grab one now just to see how they fit.

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                I've only got the budget for one sport coat for the season. Which fall material would be more versatile for a college student: tweed, or corduroy?

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                  Tweed, IMO. I guess corduroy is dressier if you go dark, so it depends a little on your needs.

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                    Originally posted by Aaron P. View Post
                    I've only got the budget for one sport coat for the season. Which fall material would be more versatile for a college student: tweed, or corduroy?
                    I'll vote for tweed too. Depends on your climate tho. I've got this one from JCF and I can only really wear it when its in the 50s, which isn't too often in Houston.

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                      Originally posted by bjmcgeever View Post
                      I'll vote for tweed too. Depends on your climate tho. I've got this one from JCF and I can only really wear it when its in the 50s, which isn't too often in Houston.
                      I agree. I have the same herringbone in Navy and it is pretty warm. Of course in Kansas this time of year that is not a problem.

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                        I would say the corduroy, rather. For a college student, the tweed seems like it might look like you're in "stereotypical college professor" costume. Corduroy works well and you can still dress it up/down as needed. Works more for the kinds of parties I expect students to be attending.

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                          I loved corduroy and jeans in college. Tweed I wouldn't have touched with a 10 ft pole, but maybe I was too young and unworldly.

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                            Hey guys, quick question:
                            I'm a poor grad student and need something to get me through a Boston winter. I'm debating between the LL Bean duck boots with Thinsulate and something like the Chippewa Apache/ Service boots (I will waterproof them). I already have some more casual options like Clarks DB and the Deacons. Any advice?

                            P.S. I also work in a pretty casual office where either should be okay but the Chips may be better.

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                              If you live in Boston how can you pass on the Beans? Eh? Eh?

                              Joking aside, I think the Chipps Service boot is pretty sweet. But I've never spent a winter up north so I'd imagine we are thinking of two very different things when it comes to "bad weather".

                              Comment


                                LL Bean. That's what they're designed for.

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