Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

What is your best coffee-making technique?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #61
    I used a French press for a while, but it was always too "sludgy" for me. I also broke 2 glass ones.

    I then got an Aeropress, and enjoyed it at first, but then didn't really like it. It seemed like too many steps, didn't make enough coffee, and sometimes the water/coffee would spew out the sides when pressing. I also had problems unscrewing it after pressing.

    Finally, I arrived at my favorite—the Hario V60 dripper. It is super simple and makes an excellent cup of coffee. I considered a Chemex (which would be very similar as a pour over), but due to the fact that I broke multiple glass French Presses, I decided to go with the ceramic V60 pour over. All in all, I think pour over is the best method.

    I would also recommend a good burr grinder, goose-neck kettle, and scale. These aren't absolutely necessary but make everything work just perfect. Now when I buy quality beans, my coffee is just as good (if not better) than the black coffee at hipster coffee shops.

    Comment


    • #62
      Originally posted by hornsup84 View Post
      Blast from the past post!

      My circa 2010 Cuisinart finally bit the dust last summer, so I upgraded to a Bonavita brewer and a Baratza burr grinder. It definitely was a bit of an overspend, but I like good coffee and it still saves me money relative to buying coffee (even with using only on weekends) so long as this lasts 2 years. The brewer is a definite upgrade from the Cuisinart (even when the Cuisinart was new, but absolutely from when it was on its last leg), and I like the look and simplicity of it. The grinder was totally a splurge / add-on purchase, but it's nice to have fresh ground and at a nice, consistent grind level.

      I just purchased a Baratza grinder too, and it is sweet. I think it will work wonders for my cold brews come summer.

      Comment


      • #63
        Originally posted by hockeysc23 View Post
        So I’ve yet to acquire the taste for most regular coffee. I’m one of those Starbucks preference type of guys but the price is getting too high. Espresso based drinks I tend to favor and keep debating getting a nice espresso machine. We got the ninja that tries to duplicate an espresso. It’s fine for iced coffee type drinks but nothing to write home about. With our first child on the way, finishing my mba and other stuff I feel my caffeine needs will probably need to increase.

        Has anyone here taken the plunge on a machine like the Breville? My buddy bought the 2k one. Has sent me pics of the finished product and It looks amazing but I still am still skeptical before spending that much coin on a coffee maker.
        I'd be careful about buying an espresso machine. I've tried to make good espresso/lattes at home, but they are never as good as quality coffee shop ones (although I had a much cheaper than $2k machine). I would stick to brewing coffee at home, and keeping your espresso drinks for the coffee shop. If you don't like black coffee, buy some natural creamer, and it will make your home-brewed coffee just as tasty as lattes. You could also make cold-brew to give black coffee a chance. My wife never liked black coffee either, but after she drank a few cold-brews she really started to like it.

        Comment


        • #64
          I'm going to re-up my two suggestions because they are cheap and make amazing coffee:

          Moka pot for almost espresso, but a little bit more like turkish coffee https://www.amazon.com/Bialetti-6-Cu.../dp/B000CNY6UK

          Melitta pour over https://www.amazon.com/Melitta-Coffe...01M5E5PHC?th=1

          Comment


          • #65
            @Arete thanks for the suggestions. I’ve been debating the espresso machine for about 3 years. In all my research they basically say if you don’t get a nice one don’t get one at all. Which makes the decision difficult.

            I don’t want to drink too much coffee for the breath and teeth staining but I gave up all sodas Red Bull etc. several years ago. It’s a fine balance. I traded my $2 Red Bull habit did 4 dollar coffee haha

            Comment


            • #66
              Originally posted by hockeysc23 View Post
              So I’ve yet to acquire the taste for most regular coffee. I’m one of those Starbucks preference type of guys but the price is getting too high. Espresso based drinks I tend to favor and keep debating getting a nice espresso machine. We got the ninja that tries to duplicate an espresso. It’s fine for iced coffee type drinks but nothing to write home about. With our first child on the way, finishing my mba and other stuff I feel my caffeine needs will probably need to increase.

              Has anyone here taken the plunge on a machine like the Breville? My buddy bought the 2k one. Has sent me pics of the finished product and It looks amazing but I still am still skeptical before spending that much coin on a coffee maker.
              Not exactly the same price category, but we picked up a Nespresso for about 1/5th of that cost and have been perfectly happy with it. The machine and coffees/espressos are high enough in quality that you can appreciate them (unlike Keurig IMO). Super convenient as a whole and easy to maintain.

              I consider the Aeroccino frother a required accessory for versatility's sake. One complaint is that the machine did not come with much instruction for making the different drinks, and the frother (at least my model) does not have clear markings for measuring out the milk. You get a feel for how to balance it out with some practice -- milk vs. soy, etc. Some time on YouTube and Google really goes a long way.

              Comment


              • #67
                My dream setup would be a Baratza Virtuoso, Chemex Ottomatic and a Breville Oracle Touch. Unfortunately I have neither the cash nor the kitchen space to accommodate those dreams so I just use a Baratza Virtuoso and a french press currently.

                *EDIT*
                As mentioned earlier the at home espresso game is difficult to get into. The affordable machines aren't in the same ballpark as what you would get out of a commercial La Marzocco machine (or similar). To add to that it can take the uninitiated a LOT of trial and error to figure out how to properly tamp and measure out the pour of the grinds to get a good pull out of a machine.
                Last edited by Rawfull; January 15, 2019, 12:28 PM.

                Comment


                • #68
                  Originally posted by Arête View Post
                  I used a French press for a while, but it was always too "sludgy" for me. I also broke 2 glass ones.

                  I then got an Aeropress, and enjoyed it at first, but then didn't really like it. It seemed like too many steps, didn't make enough coffee, and sometimes the water/coffee would spew out the sides when pressing. I also had problems unscrewing it after pressing.

                  Finally, I arrived at my favorite—the Hario V60 dripper. It is super simple and makes an excellent cup of coffee. I considered a Chemex (which would be very similar as a pour over), but due to the fact that I broke multiple glass French Presses, I decided to go with the ceramic V60 pour over. All in all, I think pour over is the best method.

                  I would also recommend a good burr grinder, goose-neck kettle, and scale. These aren't absolutely necessary but make everything work just perfect. Now when I buy quality beans, my coffee is just as good (if not better) than the black coffee at hipster coffee shops.
                  Now I go to a coffee shop on the ground floor, but I used to love two different types of coffee. The first I learned about when I was in Turkey. They bury a Turkish coffee pot in a big bowl of hot sand and it starts boiling, the only thing you should do is removing the crust on the top of the pot. Of course, we don't have sand and I used to make it on the stove, but the effect, I think, is the same. I liked the process itself, it was kind of my morning routine. And the other one, too, was French press, especially for that I was buying dry roasted Brazilian beans

                  Comment


                  • #69
                    Originally posted by Arête View Post
                    I just purchased a Baratza grinder too, and it is sweet. I think it will work wonders for my cold brews come summer.
                    Hi, just checking how's the Baratza you bought? Is it this one??I see you posted your comment one year ago, and I'm about to order one from Amazon, wanted to know if it's still working ;D

                    Comment


                    • #70
                      I've been using Baratza grinders for years and wouldn't hesitate to recommend them for filter or espresso. Though I use a Mahlkonig K30 for espresso, I have used Baratza's Sette on occassion and it's quite good for a smaller machine. For filter brewing, I'm using the Baratza Vario but it's a pricey one and I think that the Virtuoso does a fine job (no pun intended) for a bit less.

                      Having said that... If you're not in a hurry, I'd consider pre-ordering the Fellow Ode Brew Grinder. Fellow products are great - I use a number of their devices - and the research and technology going into this grinder makes it very promising. Large flat burrs are always best but only seen in the much larger grinders like the EK43, etc... I backed this Kickstarter project (I love backing coffee projects!) and am expecting great things from it.

                      FWIW, my equipment/methods are:
                      Espresso
                      Mahlkonig K30 grinder
                      Izzo Duetto II
                      Cafelat tamper

                      Filter
                      Baratza Vario grinder
                      December dripper
                      Kruve sifter
                      Fellow Stagg kettle
                      Melodrip
                      (Fellow Stagg pour-over for traveling)
                      Last edited by JohnR; March 15, 2020, 12:06 PM.

                      Comment


                      • #71
                        I've had the same Rancilio Silvia machine and Rocky grinder for around 14 years. They still work like a champ. I was an espresso every day guy for years, so they've both seen a ton of use.
                        Lately, I've been doing espresso on the weekends, and use an aero press for the weekdays. Mainly because I've become a fan of glugging a bunch of Bailey's in it for the office...

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X