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Definitions of "skimping"

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    Definitions of "skimping"

    One of the things I like about Dappered is the nod to value and recognition that some folks that want to dress well have realistic budgets - I'm not sure that the qualifier at the end of today's updated boot post adequately softens the effect of describing the purchase of $200 shoes as "skimping". Not a huge complaint, but perhaps some consideration can be given to how these descriptions come across.

    #2
    Originally posted by RhythmUNC View Post
    One of the things I like about Dappered is the nod to value and recognition that some folks that want to dress well have realistic budgets - I'm not sure that the qualifier at the end of today's updated boot post adequately softens the effect of describing the purchase of $200 shoes as "skimping". Not a huge complaint, but perhaps some consideration can be given to how these descriptions come across.
    I completely understand your comments. It's something that I struggle with as I believe everyone's definition of "budget" or "value" is different. For some, $200 is at the top of their budget. For others that may have a more advanced palate or higher budget, $400+ isn't all that odd. Dappered's readers are vast, so.. do you only show sub-$200 items for the smaller budget crowd? No, I think you show multiple options in various price tiers and hope the readership can infer and make decisions based on their own unique situations.

    At the end of the day, if we use Allen Edmonds as the Dappered benchmark, then sub-$200 would be "skimp" while $300ish is "spend" and $400+ is "splurge". At least, that's how I see it.

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      #3
      I agree that the terms "skimp" and "spend" can mean vastly different things depending on the person. I even view the terms as having less to do with cost and more to do with usage.

      For example, it's very rare for me to wear dress shoes more than 5-10 times a year so I would consider $250 dress shoes to be "splurge" worthy for dress shoes because I don't have the need for really nice, expensive dress shoes (even though I'm very fortunate and could afford that price). However, I wear a sweater just about everyday when the weather cools down so although some would consider a $130 sweater to be a "splurge" I would personally consider that the be "spend" or even on the edge of "skimp" depending on the quality.

      I think it makes the most sense to do away with those terms altogether and just have different options at different price points. If you have 6 shoes, why do 2 have to be "skimp", 2 "spend", and 2 "splurge"? I love seeing multiple options and different prices, but why not just list them from least to most expensive and completely leave out the terminology?

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        #4
        I was reading that boot article, doing a little research in the search bar. I kind of like the "skimp", "spend", "splurge" methodology; its a little more fun than just price brackets or whatever. Here's kind of how I think of it. "Skimp" is just about getting The Look at an affordable price. You're getting a good item, but making compromises to keep the cost down. Its something for light duty, office, or social wear. $200 is definitely in the skimp range when you're talking about boots. You can still get full grain leather and GYW construction, but it probably has a cardboard counter and poron midsole. Those "cut boots in half" videos on Youtube are very illuminating as far as how different boot makers use synthetic materials to get to a pricepoint. Not what you want for logging or firefighting, but fine for 99% of Dappered usage. "Spend" is where durability and functionality are paramount. Its the pricepoint where you're getting natural materials like cork and leather in the inside construction and paying American or European manufacturing costs. I think "spend" is where you want to be if you actually use your boots for a living, and its where you get the best long term value in terms of hard wearing and recraftability. "Splurge" is next level - custom fit, exotic leather, reinforced everything, etc. Luxury.

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          #5
          Originally posted by tankerjohn View Post
          I was reading that boot article, doing a little research in the search bar. I kind of like the "skimp", "spend", "splurge" methodology; its a little more fun than just price brackets or whatever. Here's kind of how I think of it. "Skimp" is just about getting The Look at an affordable price. You're getting a good item, but making compromises to keep the cost down. Its something for light duty, office, or social wear. $200 is definitely in the skimp range when you're talking about boots. You can still get full grain leather and GYW construction, but it probably has a cardboard counter and poron midsole. Those "cut boots in half" videos on Youtube are very illuminating as far as how different boot makers use synthetic materials to get to a pricepoint. Not what you want for logging or firefighting, but fine for 99% of Dappered usage. "Spend" is where durability and functionality are paramount. Its the pricepoint where you're getting natural materials like cork and leather in the inside construction and paying American or European manufacturing costs. I think "spend" is where you want to be if you actually use your boots for a living, and its where you get the best long term value in terms of hard wearing and recraftability. "Splurge" is next level - custom fit, exotic leather, reinforced everything, etc. Luxury.
          I agree.

          Lots of menswear enthusiasts also overlook the price of unique designs. It's much easier to "allocate" funds towards a Goodyear welt or higher quality Horween and French/English leathers, because that's a tangible feature whereas a well-made, artfully tailored last or unique details (fudging, wheeling, fiddleback waist, tapered heel block, etc.) can be much harder to sell at a premium. You're going to find those "look closer!" details on the spend and splurge levels.

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