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  • Nandyn
    replied
    Originally posted by calexako View Post
    Is it though? How can you tell? Because he seems to say pretty clearly that you can't do it on your own, which is something i disagree with. I don't know the guy so i take what he says in face value.
    .....just... Wow... Reading comprehension and critical thinking... Like how he says he doesn't understand why everyone doesn't hire the trainer from magic Mike and HAVE THE TV STUDIO PAY FOR EVERYTHING, and whatnot....whatever you do, avoid reading any articles from the Onion. And definitely avoid "A Modest Proposal."

    Just realized you could be trolling, if so, well played good sir.
    Last edited by Nandyn; October 26, 2018, 01:32 PM.

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  • calexako
    replied
    Is it though? How can you tell? Because he seems to say pretty clearly that you can't do it on your own, which is something i disagree with. I don't know the guy so i take what he says in face value.

    Leave a comment:


  • mebejoseph
    replied
    What I would be interested in here, and maybe others would find it helpful, would be share about your weight history and how it makes you feel. I'll start

    I was a very fat kid that really started to pack on weight when my parents divorced when I was almost 8 years old. This was in the 60's, and nobody we knew had divorced. I remember being in 3rd grade and weighing 130 pounds, and being only about 4 foot 9 inches. Food was my only comfort--I could drink or take drugs obviously. A few years earlier my infant brother had died and my mother was dealing with her own shit from that plus the divorce--being 26 or 27 years old and having three living kids under 8.

    I was left in the care of a cruel older cousin teenager most of that summer and he tortured me. I won't go into the deletes of the abuse he heaped on me.

    At any rate, food was my only comfort. So, I ate. By the time I was 12, I was 215 pounds and only 5 feet 6 inches. In my late teens and early 20's, I was able to gain a little control over my weight through fasting one day a week and massive amounts of exercise.

    But, after going through a divorce around 29, I started to really pack on the weight again. Soon, I was 6' 2" and about 260 pounds. (I look best about 180-185 when I don't have a lot of muscle).

    I remember the day it all changed for me. It was about a six months to year after my divorce and I was hitting on a woman in a bar. She was clearly NOT interested. But she said, "You seem so depressed. You know what helps me with that? Exercise. You really should think about working out on a regular basis."

    And I took her advice. The most important thing about that is that it saved my life 25 years later when I had a heart attack. I never stopped doing cardio at least three to five times a week for 30-45 minutes at a time at least. Doctors told me it saved my life.

    But, back to the timeline--I made some good friends at the gym. Within about two years I was in amazing great shape. I was spending 10 to 15 hours a week in the gym and running five or ten miles on Saturdays.

    When I was 35 I decided to go to law school. That sure cut back on the exercise time and I started to get fatter--not bad, but fatter. I didn't have time to exercise nearly as much, but I did some, and started to struggle with my weight again.

    I went up and down through my 40's and early 50's between about 185 and 215. For a while I was buying appetite suppressants from India, until the customs department confiscated one of the packages and sent me a letter warning me that if I did it again, I might get arrested. Oops.

    I was about 215 when I had my heart attack and afterwards, I focused on getting control again. I started running more. And then I had a problem with an old back surgery I had in my 20's. I started to lose the use of my right foot. Two years ago from today, I could barely walk (I know cuz the facebook memory popped up). By the time I had surgery to fix the problem in early 2016, I was up over 220. I had to get all new shirts and none of my lawyer suits fit anymore.

    But after the surgery, I started to focus again, started to exercise, started to track my calories with LoseIt and the weight has been slowly coming off since then.

    I had my cholesterol checked this week and with the help of meds and a way better diet, it is down to 113 from 285 when I had my heart attack.

    I was 192.8 today. Getting close to my ideal weight again. Last night I was trying on my jeans and even my "skinny" jeans were too loose. My wife wants me to get some new ones before we go to New Orleans in two weeks. And added benefit is that my wife joined me on this weight loss journey, and even though she's in her mid-40's, her weight is down to what she was in her early 20's when she did a little modeling.

    I would love to get to 185 again and stay there. I've never been able to stay there more than a month or two. But I have my diet dialed in now. After a couple of years of weighing and measuring my food, I can estimate a portion size and the calories pretty well.

    My upcoming hurdles are going to be this New Orleans trip. I gained seven pounds in four or five days last time I was there. And of course, the upcoming holiday season! I'm cooking Thanksgiving dinner this year. And I cook by tasting. And then I eat it all at dinner as well. Plus the holiday parties.

    I think my goal is going to be to maintain myself under 195 until the New Year and then focus on the last ten pounds.

    Here's my biggest issue: It doesn't matter how much I weigh--I always see the fat kid and the fat man. Even when I was in top shape. My therapist told me years ago that it is the hardest thing to shake about one's self image--that if you grew up fat, you are always going to see yourself as fat when you look in the mirror. And it's so true. All I see is my stomach. Even when it's not there.

    Okay, that's me. Anybody else want to share?

    Leave a comment:


  • Nandyn
    replied
    Originally posted by calexako View Post
    This is the biggest bunch of BS and defeatist behavior that I have heard in a while.
    Ummm..... Do...you...do you understand sarcasm? Because it's very obviously sarcasm...

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  • calexako
    replied
    Originally posted by Nandyn View Post
    This is the biggest bunch of BS and defeatist behavior that I have heard in a while.

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  • ElDub
    replied
    Originally posted by LesserBlackDog View Post
    You can't outrun your diet. If your weight has plateaued and your goal is to move numbers on the scale, you need to reevaluate your nutrition. Increasing your running training is great if your goal is to get faster, go longer, and do better at running, but unless you are looking at adding an extra 5 miles a day on top of whatever you're already running (without increasing your food intake), modifying your nutrition habits is going to be far more effective at shedding excess bodyweight.

    Fitness is a function of exercise, but weight is always going to be much more a function of what you're putting in your body.
    Although I do appreciate the feedback, my point was more that I need to get back to what I was doing rather than soliciting advice on how to fix it.

    Having dropped 60+ lbs I have a pretty good idea of what works for me.

    Thanks!

    Leave a comment:


  • mebejoseph
    replied
    Originally posted by LesserBlackDog View Post
    You can't outrun your diet.

    ***

    Fitness is a function of exercise, but weight is always going to be much more a function of what you're putting in your body.
    Generally, true.

    But in my 30's and early 40's, I actually could. I burned 15,000 calories in a week once on a step climber machine and was doing heaving lifting. But my body can't take that kind of abuse anymore.

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  • LesserBlackDog
    replied
    Originally posted by ElDub View Post
    A few days late, but I'm in.

    I'm down to 240-245 from 300+.

    I use running as my exercise of choice. I started walking, then running, then running a lot.

    In 2013, I did my first 5k. Then I slowly built up.

    Last year I did a half-marathon, a spartan spring, a spartan super, and a 5k.

    But I have plateaued and need a new push to get down to my next goal of 225.

    I've already scheduled a half marathon for the spring, so this would be a great time to start.

    Great thread!
    You can't outrun your diet. If your weight has plateaued and your goal is to move numbers on the scale, you need to reevaluate your nutrition. Increasing your running training is great if your goal is to get faster, go longer, and do better at running, but unless you are looking at adding an extra 5 miles a day on top of whatever you're already running (without increasing your food intake), modifying your nutrition habits is going to be far more effective at shedding excess bodyweight.

    Fitness is a function of exercise, but weight is always going to be much more a function of what you're putting in your body.

    Leave a comment:


  • ElDub
    replied
    A few days late, but I'm in.

    I'm down to 240-245 from 300+. When I started my new job I'm at now 7 years ago, I was a size 48 waist and wore 3X clothing. Now I'm a 36 and wear XL clothing

    I use running as my exercise of choice. I started walking, then running, then running a lot.

    In 2013, I did my first 5k. Then I slowly built up to 10ks.

    In 2017 I did my first spartan sprint.

    This year I have completed a half-marathon, a spartan sprint, a spartan super, and a 5k.

    My goal is to get a trifecta (sprint, super, beast spartan race finishes), but to do that, I have to lose a chunk of weight.

    I have plateaued and need a new push to get down to my next goal of 225.

    I've already scheduled a half marathon for the spring, so this would be a great time to start losing!

    Great thread!
    Last edited by ElDub; October 26, 2018, 11:51 AM.

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  • Nandyn
    replied
    Originally posted by DocDave View Post
    Well that bit abut not eating sugar and carbs is probably good advice. I think I eat way too much sugar. Did I mention my ability to inhale a whole bag of those mini Halloween chocolate bars in two days? Yeah. I know.

    And the booze thing too. Need to cut down on that. Although with winter ales coming out, and my love of dark winter beer, that might be easier said than done.
    Actually, don't think about foods as good/bad. This article has some great advice on how to approach/view food:

    https://www.bodybuilding.com/content...-training.html

    Leave a comment:


  • DocDave
    replied
    Well that bit abut not eating sugar and carbs is probably good advice. I think I eat way too much sugar. Did I mention my ability to inhale a whole bag of those mini Halloween chocolate bars in two days? Yeah. I know.

    And the booze thing too. Need to cut down on that. Although with winter ales coming out, and my love of dark winter beer, that might be easier said than done.

    Leave a comment:


  • Nandyn
    replied

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  • Gradstudent78
    replied
    Originally posted by Shade View Post
    Most gyms have skin fold calipers, or you can buy a pair for cheap on Amazon. I find this to be the most effective and reliable method to test your body fat percentage. There is plenty of literature and videos on the web to learn how to measure yourself. I find this to be the most reliable method as well, because a lot of time people will not measure the correct or same areas on the body, that should be measured.
    It's pretty hard to do this accurately on yourself (even doing it on someone else accurately requires a fair amount of training/practice) and those cheap calipers really don't compare to a good set of spring loaded ones.

    Leave a comment:


  • Shade
    replied
    Most gyms have skin fold calipers, or you can buy a pair for cheap on Amazon. I find this to be the most effective and reliable method to test your body fat percentage. There is plenty of literature and videos on the web to learn how to measure yourself. I find this to be the most reliable method as well, because a lot of time people will not measure the correct or same areas on the body, that should be measured.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gradstudent78
    replied
    Originally posted by Nandyn View Post

    Also, don't use the BMI, as it's absolutely garbage and has nothing to do with fitness or health. It was developed by a mathematician, not a physician. Using the BMI to measure fitness/health/obesity is like using phrenology to measure intelligence.

    ( Here's a good article about why BMI is so stupid: https://www.npr.org/templates/story/...ryId=106268439 )
    For most men an easy to take measurement and fairly reflective of most people's goals is going to be waist circumference. You can even calculate waist to height if you want a more useful (than BMI) index measure

    Leave a comment:

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