Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Dappered Weight Loss Club Anyone?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    #31
    Originally posted by JBarwick View Post
    The top 3 things you can do to improve health outcomes in general:
    1. Don't smoke.
    2. Exercise involving weights and cardio.
    3. Eat right.

    Cover these 3 things and you protect yourself from the top 3 causes of deaths these days.
    I’d add “don’t drink” or at least “drink sparingly” to that list.
    Ben

    Comment


      #32
      Originally posted by LesserBlackDog View Post
      I’d add “don’t drink” or at least “drink sparingly” to that list.
      Top 4 list doesn't have the same ring to it. Gotta have 3/5/10 to make it work.

      Comment


        #33
        Originally posted by JBarwick View Post
        Top 4 list doesn't have the same ring to it. Gotta have 3/5/10 to make it work.
        We could probably add get 7 hrs (at least) of sleep per day to round it out. So:

        1. Don't smoke.
        2.Exercise involving weights and cardio.
        3. Eat right.
        4. Drink sparingly.
        5. Get 7 hrs (minimum) sleep.

        Comment


          #34
          That works. Here is a health span vs. life span chart that is simple and to the point. If you can do the simple things in the list above, you can have the same quality of life at an advanced age but people do not think long term and want the now.

          The number 1 killer is heart issues and people ignore that. Prevention is key.

          Comment


            #35
            I'm in. 6' 2" and 190 now. Would like to get back to 180. Got a 2 and a half year old, need to get back to that pre-baby weight!

            Comment


              #36
              Someone has to be the big guy, so I'll take a run at it. I'm 6'4" and roughly 310. I'm fortunate to have a broad build, so I carry it fairly well (people are always shocked when they find out I weigh 300+), but I still think the 240-250 range would be dynamite. I've had minor successes with weight loss in the past (maybe 10 pounds here or there), but I've always ended up gaining it back. I currently have a fairly strong headwind, because my wife is pregnant (sympathy weight and all that), but also having my first child is making me reevaluate my health so I can be there for him for many years to come.

              Almost on a whim I decided to start intermittent fasting last week (trying to only eat during a noon to 8PM window). I actually don't know that I believe there's anything inherent about fasting that's good for weight loss, it's really more just a way to help myself limit calorie intake. It's also saving some money since I'd often pick up a breakfast sandwich or something on the way to work. I've been shocked by how not difficult it has been. I think I only had one day (and it was a weekend) where I found myself getting cranky a little before lunch time.

              Anyways, our scale is currently tucked away somewhere (we decided moving to a new house whilst pregnant was a good idea), so I won't be sharing any exact pound updates any time soon. Still, I figured I'd join in the fun.

              Comment


                #37
                So gents, any suggestions on how we are going to lose this weight? Support group here is one thing. But actually putting it in to motion is another.

                Never having done anything like this before, I'm uncertain how to proceed. Share low-cat recipes? Something else?

                Comment


                  #38
                  Originally posted by DocDave View Post
                  So gents, any suggestions on how we are going to lose this weight? Support group here is one thing. But actually putting it in to motion is another.

                  Never having done anything like this before, I'm uncertain how to proceed. Share low-cat recipes? Something else?
                  Highly recommend that everyone at least get the free version of the Lose It app and start logging what they eat. I'm not going to get into the low fat/low carb/low calorie debate--you can track anything you want on there.

                  What's worked for me the last few years is counting calories on that app. I'm down about 25 pounds in that time and just want to lose the last 8-10 to be really lean.

                  There are "social" features on there that allow people to make groups and communicate their goals, etc.
                  WHY ARE THE GUYS IN SUITS HERE? HAS SOMETHING GONE WRONG?

                  Comment


                    #39
                    I second the recommendation for LoseIt or another meal tracking app or program. 95% of weight boils down to nutritional choices, and it’s a lot easier to adjust your nutrition if you understand your current habits. You can track for calories or macros (protein/fat/carbs) or just assess whether you are overeating at certain meals, and then make adjustments accordingly.

                    Getting a food scale and actually measuring out and logging your food can have an impact without you even needing to make significant changes, as you may find yourself surprised at how what regular “serving sizes” actually look like and you may find yourself skipping those extra helpings because you know you’re going to have to log them.

                    After nutrition, the next biggest factor will be to maintain consistent exercise habits. TBH I don’t think it even matters what you do, whether it’s road biking or obstacle course racing or Olympic weightlifting classes or hot yoga or whatever, as long as it’s something you can motivate yourself to commit to as a regular lifestyle practice.

                    It’s important to consider the changes you make in both nutrition and fitness to be permanent lifestyle changes. Most crash diets and boot camp type workout programs are only effective in the short term and your body will tend to revert to its previous peak weight once you are done with them. It’s better to make small changes that you can stick to over the long term than to try to lose weight quickly.

                    Also important: Be nice to yourself. Losing weight is fucking hard. Our bodies do not want to do it, our brains are hard-wired against it, and we have been socially conditioned from birth to be literally addicted to sweet, salty, and fatty foods. There may be days when you end up eating an entire pizza and a pitcher of beer instead of that kale salad you specifically prepped. That’s okay - just be nice to yourself and try again the next day. Success will come from long-term dedication - the occasional off day isn’t going to have much impact as long as you’re generally consistent.
                    Ben

                    Comment


                      #40
                      Originally posted by LesserBlackDog View Post
                      It’s important to consider the changes you make in both nutrition and fitness to be permanent lifestyle changes. Most crash diets and boot camp type workout programs are only effective in the short term and your body will tend to revert to its previous peak weight once you are done with them. It’s better to make small changes that you can stick to over the long term than to try to lose weight quickly.

                      Also important: Be nice to yourself. Losing weight is fucking hard. Our bodies do not want to do it, our brains are hard-wired against it, and we have been socially conditioned from birth to be literally addicted to sweet, salty, and fatty foods. There may be days when you end up eating an entire pizza and a pitcher of beer instead of that kale salad you specifically prepped. That’s okay - just be nice to yourself and try again the next day. Success will come from long-term dedication - the occasional off day isn’t going to have much impact as long as you’re generally consistent.
                      This is everything. Sage words.

                      Comment


                        #41
                        Seconding LBD it's about 1% habit changes - every time I do this I build another good habit so here's some of the things that are good rules of thumb that I've figured out.

                        1. Only weigh yourself once a week (or only count once a week). Do it at the same time (I say morning) and then don't look at the scale otherwise throughout the week, you find yourself fussing over a pound or two you pick up between breakfast and lunch and rejiggering your meal plan even though it just screws with everything else.

                        2. I love the fitbit app and I set my calories to sedentary - I also track almost everything I'm going to eat that day ahead of time, which shows me how much I've got to work with for say, a beer after work or if I go out to lunch with a co-worker.

                        3. Make some light, easy exercise a ritual, I'm remote so my "daily commute" is a 30 min morning walk.

                        4. And yeah, be nice to yourself, i think one of the best things I'm getting out of reading this thread is there are a bunch of dudes out there who have the same frustrations with this stuff that I do - this is something we'll fight until we're dead, so maybe settle back in for the long haul.

                        I'll weigh myself on Monday, in the meantime here's a quick easy breakfast that does a decent job:
                        a 1/3 cup of oatmeal (microwaved)
                        2 eggs
                        1/2 oz feta cheese
                        1 cup of spinach
                        salsa/siracha to taste.

                        329 cal, 15 grams fat, 31 grams carbs, 20 grams protein. Keeps you full till lunch.

                        Comment


                          #42
                          I have found if you can join some sort of group for workouts, it can help you stay accountable. With kids I have found this hard but do enjoy the days I can get out with my running friends for a trail run.

                          I also realized that our recipe book is not very healthy so for dinner I am at the whims of my wife. For breakfast and lunch I am on my own so for breakfast I have cereal, milk, fruit. I limit my intake by bowl size and realize this varies by dish set you've purchased but knowing what a serving size looks like on/in you dishes is helpful. For lunch, I usually try to do vegetarian or a protein and starch. My standard lunch is protein, rice, veggies which I make in advance on Sunday's and covers 3 lunches out of a 5 day period.

                          Standard lunch: Zataran's rice mix (I have lived on this stuff for going on a decade), protein (1lb) or beans (1 can), and frozen veggies mixed in (usually 20oz).
                          Other takes: Protein (your choice but 1lb - 1.5lbs), sweet potatoes. I roast each and season as I feel like. Sometimes it takes on a spicy vibe and sometimes it is more savory. Having herbs on hand really helps.

                          Overall, controlling my breakfast and lunches have been a life saver. I used to do a protein shake in the mornings but those can pack a lot of calories and were only helpful when I was running 50+ miles per week and needed calories.

                          Comment


                            #43
                            For healthier recipes that still pack a lot of flavor, I can't recommend Skinnytaste enough. Gina finds ways to cut calories and fat out of a lot of richer dishes without sacrificing too much flavor.

                            Comment


                              #44
                              Good tips gents! I like the idea of logging what I'm doing/eating. I am going to use MyFitnessPal for this. I can use the app to track my workouts as well as all of the food I'm eating. I realize from using it in the past that sometimes I have to make a 'best guess' as to what the calorie count was, but I usually err on the higher side.

                              And I definitely going to cut down the amount of beer that I'm drinking. It's a) getting to be habit which is starting to cause me some concern and b) it is just empty calories! I'm not giving up beer completely, but maybe stopping consumption during the week.

                              Comment


                                #45
                                Some good research results looking at people who have lost weight and successfully kept it off to keep in mind (although skews heavily female, and men tend to have a weight loss advantage):
                                http://www.nwcr.ws/Research/default.htm


                                98% of Registry participants report that they modified their food intake in some way to lose weight.

                                94% increased their physical activity, with the most frequently reported form of activity being walking.

                                There is variety in how NWCR members keep the weight off. Most report continuing to maintain a low calorie, low fat diet and doing high levels of activity.



                                78% eat breakfast every day.
                                75% weigh themselves at least once a week.
                                62% watch less than 10 hours of TV per week.
                                90% exercise, on average, about 1 hour per day.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X