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    #61
    Just finished both of Jordan Belfort's (the "Wolf of Wall Street") books/memoirs. Crazy stuff. Now starting Lone Survivor.

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      #62
      Just finished "Why We Make Things and Why It Matters" by Peter Korn.

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        #63
        I have been plowing through the Game of Thrones books in preparation for Season 4 airing soon in April. I watched all the previous seasons, but it got confusing with all the different characters, and it was difficult to follow the battle strategies on the TV show. Never read any of the books before now.

        I finished books 1-3 so far (takes me though the TV seasons 1-3 and into the upcoming season 4). The books, as expected, flesh out the characters more deeply, and I now understand all the different minor characters better. Also easier to follow the battles and geography with the maps in the front.

        I am currently reading Book 4.

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          #64
          Originally posted by Shomas View Post
          Thanks, Yoyorobbo for the sff audio podcast recommendation!
          For sure, man! Some of it is just OK - but many times I've really enjoyed the episodes. TONS of material on their site, aside from strictly podcasts, too. Some good reviews, and some really cool scans of vintage scifi/fantasy trades, etc. The main gent is a huge PKD fan, and he has scanned tons of stuff from the old mags. Really worth a look, IMO.

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            #65
            Originally posted by redbeardedmike View Post
            @Yoyo - if you love HP Lovecraft and podcast occasionally, you might want to check out the Welcome to Nightvale podcast. It was originally described to me as a satirical cross between NPR and the X Files, but I don't think that gets it quite right. The head writer contributed to the Untold Stories of H.P. Lovecraft and the producer is an entity called Commonplace Books.

            It's fun.
            Cool! Thanks, man. How the heck did I NOT already know about that one? Just read a blurb on it in an older Wired article. Looks like I should've seen it atop the charts in iTunes. Ah well. Gonna DL ep1 right now and check it out. Again, thanks!

            BTW, speaking of HPL-related podcasts, I reaaaaaally like Chad Fifer and Chris Lackey's The H.P. Lovecraft Literary Podcast. Those guys are great, and really know the material. They are both heavily involved in recent and current HPL projects, especially the films of the past several years by the HPL Historical Society. If you have any interest in Lovecraft, I highly recommend their show. BTW, they have since moved on to other supernatural/horror fiction works, but I think they are mostly a subscriber-only deal now. It's cheap, though. Anyway, you can still check out any of their older episodes (the HPL stuff) for free, along with some freebies here and there with the newer episodes. They also have some audio-readings which they produced available for DL and listen too. Cool stuff.

            Another similar podcast, however for the Ghost Stories of M.R. James, is A Podcast to the Curious. It is also excellent, and IIRC was actually inspired by Chad and Chris's HPL podacst. Pretty sure that's accurate. Anyway, really good stuff there too.

            I just find it interesting to hear discussion, and different takes on some of these old school supernatural stories. Sometimes they can be a little tough to fully-grasp with just your own reading and interpretation, so hearing some other folks talk about them is often a very cool alternative. Kinda like a (typically) weekly virtual "Short Story Club."

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              #66
              One more thing before I bust outta here: I read that "Stone Mattress" SS by Atwood, with my morning coffee the other day. I liked it quite a bit. Not sure how it translates to her current writing style - or if that has changed at all, actually across here various works - but I liked it enough that I'd like to read some more of her stuff.

              So although the dystopian subject/story of Oryx and Crake sounds very tempting, I may try some more of her shorter fiction, if I can find a collection locally. If not, I guess I'll dive into the novel (trilogy). Anything else by her you guys recommend, aside from OaC and The Handmaid's Tale?

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                #67
                Originally posted by yoyorobbo View Post
                One more thing before I bust outta here: I read that "Stone Mattress" SS by Atwood, with my morning coffee the other day. I liked it quite a bit. Not sure how it translates to her current writing style - or if that has changed at all, actually across here various works - but I liked it enough that I'd like to read some more of her stuff.

                So although the dystopian subject/story of Oryx and Crake sounds very tempting, I may try some more of her shorter fiction, if I can find a collection locally. If not, I guess I'll dive into the novel (trilogy). Anything else by her you guys recommend, aside from OaC and The Handmaid's Tale?
                I haven't read it, and I don't think it's scifi, but The Blind Assassin won her the Man Booker prize in 2000, so that's a pretty glowing recommendation.

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                  #68
                  Currently reading Camus' the Plague and I'll follow up with The Fall soon. I finished Lolita and Invitation to a Beheading by Vladimir Nabokov and The Castle by Kafka before spring semester began. On another note, my copy of Gravity's Rainbow is just chilling on my shelf and I'm only about 2/7 through one of the densest pieces of literature ever. Did anyone get around to reading alot of Pynchon's works? I'm doubting if I can ever get through it.

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                    #69
                    HP Lovecraft, Poe and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle are my favorite authors. But Lovecraft takes the surreal/horror/macabre to a whole new level. The guy had a twisted imagination, albeit one that was years ahead of most authors at the time

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                      #70
                      Just finished Gone Girl. It was a good read, but I wasn't crazy about the ending.

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                        #71
                        Originally posted by gaseousclay View Post
                        HP Lovecraft, Poe and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle are my favorite authors. But Lovecraft takes the surreal/horror/macabre to a whole new level. The guy had a twisted imagination, albeit one that was years ahead of most authors at the time
                        I'm currently reading The King in Yellow by Robert W. Chambers. He was somewhat of a precursor to Lovecraft. I'm really enjoying it, especially since it seems to have been a major influence on the creators of True Detective.

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                          #72
                          Originally posted by gaseousclay View Post
                          HP Lovecraft, Poe and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle are my favorite authors. But Lovecraft takes the surreal/horror/macabre to a whole new level. The guy had a twisted imagination, albeit one that was years ahead of most authors at the time
                          Great tastes! I'm surrounded with tomes of their work, here in my office/den.

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                            #73
                            Originally posted by cforsyth View Post
                            I'm currently reading The King in Yellow by Robert W. Chambers. He was somewhat of a precursor to Lovecraft. I'm really enjoying it, especially since it seems to have been a major influence on the creators of True Detective.
                            Cool! You may then find these posts interesting, if you dig podcasts, audiobooks, or just discussion in general of books/stories you're reading or have read. They're both on the SFF Audio podcast/site I mentioned the other day:

                            LibriVox: The King In Yellow by Robert W. Chambers

                            The WEIRD FICTION roots of TRUE DETECTIVE

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                              #74
                              Reading "Love Goes to Buildings on Fire: Five Years in New York that Changed Music Forever." I'm a sucker for stories about the CBGB's crowd, and this has the added bonus of covering all the other genres (minimalism, hip hop, etc.) that were coalescing at the time.

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                                #75
                                Thanks for the links, yoyo. I've also been listening to Welcome to Nightvale the last couple of months. It's amazing. They do a live show that I'm hoping to catch this month.

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