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    Originally posted by joekloo View Post
    Let me help you guys on books not to read: River of Doubt by Candice Millard - It was 90% about the jungles of South America and 10% about Roosevelt. (unless jungle details are your thing)

    This is disappointing to hear. I listened to both Hero of the Empire (mostly about Churchill's escape as a POW during the Second Boer War, but a lot of good historical background about British colonial policy and how this time shaped some of Churchill's views) and Destiny of the Republic (assassination of President Garfield, but the heart of the book is about how medical science failed him, as he lived for a couple of months after he was shot, and if his doctors hadn't rejected antiseptic practices, he very likely would have survived, as he died from massive infections, not the bullet wound) and found both books to be excellent.

    Ah well, I still have the third volume of Edmund Morris's TR trilogy to finish.

    Edit: After posting this, I think I'm beginning to see a pattern in Millard's books. She takes a relatively well-known/written about event, and tries to not only layer in context, but to examine seemingly peripheral events or people and make them the center of the story.
    Last edited by burban; November 5, 2018, 02:45 PM. Reason: More thoughts

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      You should read The Last Place on Earth by Roland Huntford - it's a dual biography of Roald Amundsen and Robert Falcon Scott with vivid depictions of their dueling Antarctic expeditions to the South Pole.

      I'm currently just starting to reread The Sign of the Four - one of the Sherlock Holmes novels by Arthur Conan Doyle. I bought an "Ultimate Collection" of Sherlock Holmes for my Kindle a few years back because it was cheap ($0.99 if I recall) and I wanted to re-read Hound of the Baskervilles for Halloween. That collection at the time had all the short stories plus two of the novels (the aforementioned Hound and The Valley of Fear) but was missing the other two novels - A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of the Four. At some point, without me doing anything, the final two novels must have been added to the collection and uploaded to my kindle. So here we are, free lit for me.
      “Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence on society.” – Mark Twain

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        I just finished Peace by Gene Wolfe, which I found great and fascinating to the point where I'm probably going to start re-read in short order. Tough book to describe without giving too much away - on the surface it's the memoir of a rich old man, comprising a series of anecdotes about his life in a small Midwestern town. But gradually the stories, and the stories-within-those-stories, and the fairy tales/fables-related-by-characters-within-those-stories, signal that something else is going on. I've read Wolfe before and I'm familiar with his style, but this is the first time with him that I've paid the text the level of attention it demands, literally with pen in hand and a notebook nearby to track all the different relationships and little hints & details. I've been wanting to do a re-read of Wolfe's Book of the New Sun series and frankly approached Peace as a "practice" book for that effort, and ended up really loving on its own merits. Still think I'll read a bit more of his standalone work before tackling BotNS though.

        Also reading The Debatable Land: The Lost World Between Scotland and England by Graham Robb, a professor who moved to the area and became interested in the local history and geography. About halfway through, it's interesting but would definitely be improved by more maps and photos, as it sounds like a beautiful area (guessing budget limitations played a role).
        “There are moments, Jeeves, when one asks oneself, 'Do trousers matter?'"
        "The mood will pass, sir.”

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          I actually just finished Cane by Toomer and read the sound and the fury again. Faulkner is an idol of mine, and I've decided to re-read this and as I lay dying at at least once a year. I think if anyone has even a passing interest in black American literature or the Harlem renaissance then Cane is an absolute must.


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            Originally posted by Sideswipe View Post
            I just finished Peace by Gene Wolfe, which I found great and fascinating to the point where I'm probably going to start re-read in short order. Tough book to describe without giving too much away - on the surface it's the memoir of a rich old man, comprising a series of anecdotes about his life in a small Midwestern town. But gradually the stories, and the stories-within-those-stories, and the fairy tales/fables-related-by-characters-within-those-stories, signal that something else is going on. I've read Wolfe before and I'm familiar with his style, but this is the first time with him that I've paid the text the level of attention it demands, literally with pen in hand and a notebook nearby to track all the different relationships and little hints & details. I've been wanting to do a re-read of Wolfe's Book of the New Sun series and frankly approached Peace as a "practice" book for that effort, and ended up really loving on its own merits. Still think I'll read a bit more of his standalone work before tackling BotNS though.

            Also reading The Debatable Land: The Lost World Between Scotland and England by Graham Robb, a professor who moved to the area and became interested in the local history and geography. About halfway through, it's interesting but would definitely be improved by more maps and photos, as it sounds like a beautiful area (guessing budget limitations played a role).
            Wolfe is my favorite fantasy writer hands down. He was the only person I read almost entirely through high school. And I recently re read the wizard knight series. I haven't read fantasy it in nearly a decade but it was still just as wonderful as I remember it being. He really is a master.


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              I haven't read a fantasy book in a lone while. I think the last series of books would have been The Wheel of Time. I ended up bailing on the series though because I just wouldn't end! I kept reading and waiting for the series to come to a conclusion and it never did. Not to mention the fact the stories were long, immersive reads. Kudos to those of you who have finished the books/series.

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                Originally posted by Sideswipe View Post
                I just finished Peace by Gene Wolfe, which I found great and fascinating to the point where I'm probably going to start re-read in short order. Tough book to describe without giving too much away - on the surface it's the memoir of a rich old man, comprising a series of anecdotes about his life in a small Midwestern town. But gradually the stories, and the stories-within-those-stories, and the fairy tales/fables-related-by-characters-within-those-stories, signal that something else is going on. I've read Wolfe before and I'm familiar with his style, but this is the first time with him that I've paid the text the level of attention it demands, literally with pen in hand and a notebook nearby to track all the different relationships and little hints & details. I've been wanting to do a re-read of Wolfe's Book of the New Sun series and frankly approached Peace as a "practice" book for that effort, and ended up really loving on its own merits. Still think I'll read a bit more of his standalone work before tackling BotNS though.
                I might have to check this one out. The Book of the New Sun is one of my favorites. I reread it last year and got a ton out of it that I missed before.

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                  Originally posted by Useknifeonly View Post
                  Wolfe is my favorite fantasy writer hands down. He was the only person I read almost entirely through high school. And I recently re read the wizard knight series. I haven't read fantasy it in nearly a decade but it was still just as wonderful as I remember it being. He really is a master.
                  Nice - any recommendations re: what to read next are welcome! I read and enjoyed The Wizard Knight a while back, and like I mentioned I need to revisit Book of the New Sun, but was thinking of reading either Fifth Head of Cerberus or a short story collection first.


                  Originally posted by thedrake View Post
                  I might have to check this one out. The Book of the New Sun is one of my favorites. I reread it last year and got a ton out of it that I missed before.
                  Definitely a departure from BotNS but really great - hope you like it if you do check it out, maybe we can trade theories.
                  “There are moments, Jeeves, when one asks oneself, 'Do trousers matter?'"
                  "The mood will pass, sir.”

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                    Well, this thread is a fantastic resource! My current reads (besides the same story of listening to podcasts all the time - NPR and Fatherly among the best...):

                    Team of Rivals the Doris Kearns Goodwin bio of Lincoln is my current nightly reading. Fascinating insight the history of our country at the beginning and middle of the 19th century and the political parties used to look like. It's kind of unbelievable how the Republican party started and formed, initially as the anti-slavery push that led up to the Civil War. Yes, it's super long, but as someone who reads only a little non-fiction, I am impressed with the story telling.

                    Becoming by Michelle Obama on Audible. Interesting so far, but I just started...

                    Prior reads I recommend: The Snow Child, Where'd You Go Burnadette, To Kill a Mockingbird (excellent to read as an adult - not sure why it's pegged as a YA book), and Pops by Michale Chabon (a super fast read/listen)

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                      I just finished Foe by Ian Reid. I really enjoyed this book. The pace was quick. The plot plausible. The characters interesting. And the book was short and to the point. If you're looking for a short-ish and relatively creepy book to read over the holidays give this one a god.

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                        I picked up "The Fifth Risk" by Michael Lewis on a whim. It is a short read and something interesting to think about. Part of me thought it wasn't real so I looked a few things up and surprise the book is actually telling to truth in certain instances. Consider me miffed.

                        It is a political book and I stay away from politics as much as possible.

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                          I'm reading Kitchen Confidential by Anthony Bourdain and enjoying it immensely.

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                            Just listened to Beastie Boys over the weekend on a road trip. It was interesting and I really liked that they had different people narrating. It broke it up which was nice since it is 12+ hours long.

                            I am currently reading Girl in a Band by Kim Gordon. This has been great and very honest.

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                              Girl in a Band is a great book.

                              And I need to give the Beastie Boys book a read. I'm not a huge BB fan, but I think the book will be an interesting read.

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                                Originally posted by DocDave View Post
                                I'm not a huge BB fan, but I think the book will be an interesting read.
                                I'm not a huge fan of theirs either, but the book was interesting and gives some really cool insight into the songs. Also, some people have made Spotify playlists that go along with some parts of the book.
                                The part that really intrigued me was just how much they were into punk/hardcore growing up. I knew there were influences, but not to this measure.

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