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    Currently reading 'What has government done to our money' by Murray Rothbard. It's a very interesting description of what money is and how it came to be, followed by a thorough analysis of how the government essentially destroyed it.

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      I am currently reading "The Greatest Show on Earth: The Evidence for Evolution" by Richard Dawkins. Absolutely fascinating read. Should be mandatory reading for all humans.


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        [MENTION=11780]CMAc7[/MENTION] agreed! That book is a fascinating read. Another good book to read is God Is Not Great. I highly recommend it.


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          For you folks interested in Dawkins and Hitchens, a good book that offers the other side of this argument is The Everlasting Man, by G.K. Chesterton. Just finished it a couple weeks ago.

          Another book (albeit a bit more feisty) that challenges Hitchens, Dawkins, and other Evolutionary philosophers ideas, is The Devil's Delusion, by David Berlinski.

          Now I am finishing up The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich, by William Shirer.

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            i'm sure whomever has probably posted about it a million times, but Infinite Jest is so wonderful. it never fails to get me a chuckle.

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              My hat's off to you sir for being able to finish that book (Infinite Jest). I have tried on a couple of occasions to get through the book and have never been able to make it.

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                I read A Brief History of Seven Killings over a trip earlier this month. Still not sure how I feel about it (will be discussing it at book club shortly). I was stopped and asked about it by more people than any other book I've read recently, though. Intriguing peek at some very recent Caribbena history I had no idea about (some of it speculative retelling, though).

                I also read Case Histories by Kate Atkinson (it was fine) and now I'm in the midst of A Legacy by Sybile Bedford (which has not really gotten going yet). I'm really intrigued by the recent Nobel Prize winner Secondhand Time. That might be next up.

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                  [MENTION=2598]redbeardedmike[/MENTION] I bailed on A Brief History. I managed to get approx 60 pages in and I couldn't take it anymore. The subject, while interesting to me, didn't hold my attention. I really, really wanted to give the book a go as I heard good things about it. Yet I just couldn't do it. I'm interested in hearing your take though. Was it worth it? Maybe I need to give it a try again...

                  I just took this biography of Robert Plant out of the library. Haven't started it yet, but I am looking forward to reading all about the man.

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                    Gonna reread Silence by Shusaku Endo (one of my favorite novels) since I read somewhere yesterday that the film adaptation is going to be released in December.
                    Ben

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                      Originally posted by DocDave View Post
                      [MENTION=2598]redbeardedmike[/MENTION] I bailed on A Brief History. I managed to get approx 60 pages in and I couldn't take it anymore. The subject, while interesting to me, didn't hold my attention. I really, really wanted to give the book a go as I heard good things about it. Yet I just couldn't do it. I'm interested in hearing your take though. Was it worth it? Maybe I need to give it a try again...

                      So I think that the book had some strong points and a real sense of place. But ultimately, I'm not sure what the multiple narrators, the length, and the structure did for the story. I haven't formed my thoughts completely, but not sure I'm feeling all the awards for this one.

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                        Originally posted by smoothy View Post
                        For you folks interested in Dawkins and Hitchens, a good book that offers the other side of this argument is The Everlasting Man, by G.K. Chesterton. Just finished it a couple weeks ago.
                        Love GKC, I probably re-read some combination of Orthodoxy, The Everlasting Man, and The Man Who Was Thursday every couple of years.

                        Hearkening back to the Neal Stephenson discussion a couple pages back, I read Zodiac over Labor Day weekend, not my favorite of his but still a fun read. Also recently read Charles Portis' True Grit (quick and fun as well, Mattie Ross is a hilarious narrator) and Alistair McLean's HMS Ulysses, a good but pretty brutal novel about a British naval convoy on the Russian resupply route during WWII.
                        “There are moments, Jeeves, when one asks oneself, 'Do trousers matter?'"
                        "The mood will pass, sir.”

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                          What book are you currently reading?

                          I just started Camus's "The Stranger" today. Though I generally lean toward an absurdist or nihilistic world view, I am a little startled by the callousness of the narrator thus far.


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                            Just finished Your Favorite Bad is Killing Me: What Pop Music Rivalries Reveal About the Meaning of Life by Steven Hyden. It is a quick read, and has an interesting take on the feuds between fans of groups like Pearl Jam v Nirvana, Biggie v Tupac and the like. Its a light read, easy to dip in and out of, and if you have a passing interest in popular music, somewhat interesting. As with any book based upon broad categorizations, I found myself disagreeing with the author on occasion (especially when politics made an appearance) but I appreciated why I always preferred Oasis to Blur, and all that that entails.

                            It reminds me a bit of the 33 and 1/3 series of books where authors write short novellas surrounding an album.The series of books are not just a "behind the music" account of music making and are well worth exploring.

                            I started Funny Girl by Nick Hornby, who wrote my favorite book High Fidelity. For the record, I do read books about things other than pop culture, but these are just a few.

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                              Just downloaded that to take on the upcoming trip to Iceland and the Faroe Islands. Its gonna be bleak and windswept, why not some Camus?

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                                Just started reading The Hidden Keys. Story deals with a thief, family heirlooms, and a mystery as to how they all tie together. So far, after 60 pages or so, I'm still liking the book.

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