Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The diet and exercise thread

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    #46
    Originally posted by Matchbook View Post
    Interestingly enough, I just read a couple of articles that were trying to rationalize obesity and dieting, etc...and it illustrated the negative effects that are exacerbated by being obese and rapidly losing weight, e.g. Biggest Loser contestants all destroying their metabolisms and causing long-term hormonal and endocrine imbalances that they can't overcome...often times making them fatter than they were starting out.

    I've always likened the gym to a garage. Your body is a marvel of Nature; it's like a Ferrari or a Lamborghini. Or, it could be a Honda Civic. Whatever. In either case, you wouldn't go work on your car in a garage without knowing what to do, would you? Or at least have a Helms manual, right? Same thing with your body. Far too many people start modding and working on their bodies e.g. extreme dieting, workout routines, or whatever, without actually know what they're trying to achieve or the best way to go about doing it.

    As far as your situation is concerned...it sounds like you should just keep doing what you're doing, work around and watch old injuries, and if you can, increase frequency and consistency. Otherwise, yeah, it sounds like you'll be dealing with DOMS regularly...though I'd be curious to know what your squat routine looks like. There might be some changes you can make that would help out.
    I saw those articles as well, I always thought those shows were bad but surprising to see just how bad they are for contestants, even under 'professional' supervision.

    I played competitive sports and have been lifting and learning about lifting for the years after that. It is pretty crazy to see how many people jump right in without the right training or without hesitation to some extreme regiments. I'll call out Crossfit for perpetuating a lot of this, but it's more than that. As someone who wasn't injured in the gym, it pains me seeing people do it to themselves when they're otherwise not injury-prone or already injured.

    I definitely need to just keep at it, it takes me more time to build up weight with my leg and full body lifts because of my bad leg. Without going too much into my medical history, I've had double-digit surgeries on one leg, have a ton of scar tissue and thus a drastic decrease flex. the ankle. My fibula (small bone in lower leg) is broken and floating, so my balance also sucks. I've always hated working out legs because of it, so I didn't really do myself any favors earlier in life. Calling my leg workouts a "squat routine" would be overstating it--typically lower weight, high sets/reps with the idea that I'll slowly increase weight and decrease reps as my body feels more comfortable with it. Honestly, I usually hit a bad patch at work that interrupts it before I get too far. I also sometimes head to the machines to focus on my legs separately to be able to make sure my bad leg is getting worked and to hopefully build up some stability. That's about it.

    I had a trainer when I lived in Texas that was a perfect mix between pushing me and minding my physical limitations. In the two times I've tried a trainer out in NYC, I've had (1) a pure meathead who disregarded and dismissed the limitations and (2) one who treated me like I was an octogenarian. If I wind up getting back to a decent level on my own, I'll probably try it a third time, but I can't say I'm optimistic.

    Comment


      #47
      Hey all, haven't read any of the comments since I last logged on, but I'm sure the criticism is warranted based on my attitude earlier. I apologize for coming off disrespectful; long day at the office. Shouldn't have press send on those replies.

      I meant what I said about the "Gas Station Ready" philosophy; just not as literal a it came across. It's how I train martial arts and how I lift, and it's just a shared mindset within certain corners. Nonetheless, I think no less of anyone who doesn't feel this way or train this way. I honestly wouldn't care if you did Jazzercise, as long as you're happy.

      Also, I'm not much of an aggro dick-swinging "look at me" type, so I'm not sure why I picked today to show that.

      I despise people who flap their jaws in forums, and today I was he.

      Anyway, end rant. Apologies to all

      Peace
      We are here to drink beer. We are here to kill war. We are here to laugh at the odds and live our lives so well that Death will tremble to take us.” ― Charles Bukowski

      Comment


        #48
        Originally posted by Matchbook View Post
        I don't anymore, though. I still train like I might, though. Does that mean I'm wrong? I certainly don't think that makes me paranoid. The likelihood of me finding myself in a violent situation is low nowadays, given the company I tend to keep now, and the places I frequent (though living in an urban area like LA means it's probably higher here than say, smaller, more rural pop centers).

        Anyways, I get what you're saying. But I also see, AP's point (and also a point I made) that, there's absolutely no downside to training for a fight or being "over-prepared" as it were. It's just much easier for a lot of traditionalists to frame preparedness in terms of "masculinity," I suppose.
        I can certainly agree that there's no harm to an individual training for a fight, assuming they have the excess time/money. I mean, I looked for a dress watch with 100m water resistance because--and this was my actual thought process--I didn't want to ruin the watch if I forgot I was wearing it when I was wrestling my toddler into the bathtub. Absolutely paranoid behavior with zero downside, because I bought a watch I could afford.
        Last edited by AngusM; May 10, 2016, 10:10 PM. Reason: because i'm a jerk

        Comment


          #49
          Originally posted by hornsup84 View Post
          I saw those articles as well, I always thought those shows were bad but surprising to see just how bad they are for contestants, even under 'professional' supervision.

          I played competitive sports and have been lifting and learning about lifting for the years after that. It is pretty crazy to see how many people jump right in without the right training or without hesitation to some extreme regiments. I'll call out Crossfit for perpetuating a lot of this, but it's more than that. As someone who wasn't injured in the gym, it pains me seeing people do it to themselves when they're otherwise not injury-prone or already injured.

          I definitely need to just keep at it, it takes me more time to build up weight with my leg and full body lifts because of my bad leg. Without going too much into my medical history, I've had double-digit surgeries on one leg, have a ton of scar tissue and thus a drastic decrease flex. the ankle. My fibula (small bone in lower leg) is broken and floating, so my balance also sucks. I've always hated working out legs because of it, so I didn't really do myself any favors earlier in life. Calling my leg workouts a "squat routine" would be overstating it--typically lower weight, high sets/reps with the idea that I'll slowly increase weight and decrease reps as my body feels more comfortable with it. Honestly, I usually hit a bad patch at work that interrupts it before I get too far. I also sometimes head to the machines to focus on my legs separately to be able to make sure my bad leg is getting worked and to hopefully build up some stability. That's about it.

          I had a trainer when I lived in Texas that was a perfect mix between pushing me and minding my physical limitations. In the two times I've tried a trainer out in NYC, I've had (1) a pure meathead who disregarded and dismissed the limitations and (2) one who treated me like I was an octogenarian. If I wind up getting back to a decent level on my own, I'll probably try it a third time, but I can't say I'm optimistic.
          Yeah, well, slow, safe and gradual weight loss doesn't make for very good entertainment (or inspiration in today's, now-now-now-gimme-gimme-gimme) society. Jillian Michaels and her ilk are terrible and no one should listen to "get-ripped quick" Hollywood fitness charlatans like her. Honestly, I'm of the opinion that the fitness industry, by and large, doesn't really want people to get fit. They want them "fit," as in achieving short-term progress, but nothing sustainable. And don't get me started on Crossfit.

          Anyways, sounds like you've been run through the ringer. 10+ surgeries? Still broken? That sounds absolutely terrible. But it also sounds like you've got a handle on your capabilities and how to fix it. Though, I've worked through injuries (though not nearly as severe) through pure strength training. I've been diagnosed with moderate osteoarthritis in my left shoulder (which I've separated twice) and in my left knee as well, and have been dealing with a partial PCL tear in my right knee for years (thanks, Marine Corps!). That said, heavy loading and appropriate volume has made all of those ailments much more manageable, surprisingly. Not saying that's going to work for you, but you might consider going with more moderate rep and loading schemas to see if the forced adaptation works better. It might. Though, really, what it sounds like is mobility work is definitely in the cards. I've been wanting to pick up Becoming a Supple Leopard for while now for myself. Also, yoga? That might be an option for you as well? I hear it works wonders for previous injuries and mobility issues (obvi).

          Comment


            #50
            Originally posted by APinNC View Post
            Hey all, haven't read any of the comments since I last logged on, but I'm sure the criticism is warranted based on my attitude earlier. I apologize for coming off disrespectful; long day at the office. Shouldn't have press send on those replies.

            I meant what I said about the "Gas Station Ready" philosophy; just not as literal a it came across. It's how I train martial arts and how I lift, and it's just a shared mindset within certain corners. Nonetheless, I think no less of anyone who doesn't feel this way or train this way. I honestly wouldn't care if you did Jazzercise, as long as you're happy.

            Also, I'm not much of an aggro dick-swinging "look at me" type, so I'm not sure why I picked today to show that.

            I despise people who flap their jaws in forums, and today I was he.

            Anyway, end rant. Apologies to all

            Peace
            Don't you go hogging all the blame, now. I should've given you the benefit of the doubt, and I could have expressed disagreement without being inflammatory. My apologies to you as well, and to anyone whose time has been wasted reading or responding to my off-topic and self-important replies.

            Comment


              #51
              [MENTION=12045]Matchbook[/MENTION] we have very different goals. I don't want to be very big at all. I'm happy with the size I am now, but I'd like to drop some bf. What I'm going for is Tyler Durden look, Brad Pitt in fight club. He is about 6' and was between 150-160 for the movie. Here is a pic.

              Brad Pitt is obviously a handsome man. But Tyler Durden is considered by many women and gay men to be the hottest male movie character (google it if you don't believe me). I believe that in this day and age, in metropolitan areas, that is the physique women want. I'm married, so it's irrelevant to me anyway. Either way, I just want to be lean and ripped. Getting big is not appealing to me at all.

              As for [MENTION=14885]APinNC[/MENTION] I would say if you're interested in defending yourself, spending time working on martial arts is more beneficial to spending time in the gym. Here in LA I don't know of too many fist fights happening, anyway. I know in the south it's more common. If you're in trouble in a bad neighborhood here, I would imagine your fists wouldn't be able to get you out of it. I personally don't take my family to bad neighborhoods. To me 6'2 240 is highly unappealing. At that weight you'd have to either be on gear or carrying around about 50 lbs of body fat. That is just not for me, either way.
              My Youtube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCSs1xkOEoJdPfZ4KRW575qA

              Comment


                #52
                Originally posted by Matchbook View Post
                Anyways, sounds like you've been run through the ringer. 10+ surgeries? Still broken? That sounds absolutely terrible. But it also sounds like you've got a handle on your capabilities and how to fix it. Though, I've worked through injuries (though not nearly as severe) through pure strength training. I've been diagnosed with moderate osteoarthritis in my left shoulder (which I've separated twice) and in my left knee as well, and have been dealing with a partial PCL tear in my right knee for years (thanks, Marine Corps!). That said, heavy loading and appropriate volume has made all of those ailments much more manageable, surprisingly. Not saying that's going to work for you, but you might consider going with more moderate rep and loading schemas to see if the forced adaptation works better. It might. Though, really, what it sounds like is mobility work is definitely in the cards. I've been wanting to pick up Becoming a Supple Leopard for while now for myself. Also, yoga? That might be an option for you as well? I hear it works wonders for previous injuries and mobility issues (obvi).
                Partial PCL and osteoarth is rough too. I may take you up on that advice for trying out moderate reps. Yoga is tough due to my lack of balance in one leg. But yes, mobility and stretching should be my main focus, it's just not near as fun as lifting heavy things and putting them down

                Comment


                  #53
                  Originally posted by thecharlesg View Post
                  [MENTION=12045]Matchbook[/MENTION] we have very different goals. I don't want to be very big at all. I'm happy with the size I am now, but I'd like to drop some bf. What I'm going for is Tyler Durden look, Brad Pitt in fight club. He is about 6' and was between 150-160 for the movie. Here is a pic.
                  [...]
                  Brad Pitt is obviously a handsome man. But Tyler Durden is considered by many women and gay men to be the hottest male movie character (google it if you don't believe me). I believe that in this day and age, in metropolitan areas, that is the physique women want. I'm married, so it's irrelevant to me anyway. Either way, I just want to be lean and ripped. Getting big is not appealing to me at all.

                  As for [MENTION=14885]APinNC[/MENTION] I would say if you're interested in defending yourself, spending time working on martial arts is more beneficial to spending time in the gym. Here in LA I don't know of too many fist fights happening, anyway. I know in the south it's more common. If you're in trouble in a bad neighborhood here, I would imagine your fists wouldn't be able to get you out of it. I personally don't take my family to bad neighborhoods. To me 6'2 240 is highly unappealing. At that weight you'd have to either be on gear or carrying around about 50 lbs of body fat. That is just not for me, either way.
                  Not sure where you get your math, but that'd still be 190 lean mass at 20% BF. That's about my BF% without training hard or dieting (6'3 225 currently, but have been as high as 240). Different people have different builds and can gain muscle at varying rates and amounts. Just because some frames (possibly like yours) aren't fit to hold that much lean mass or you don't want to weigh that doesn't mean it isn't possible naturally or that it looks bad on others.

                  For example, per the interwebs, Christian Bale was as high as 230 on his 6 foot frame for Batman (down to 190/200 for filming) and Ben Affleck was 228 lbs for Batman vs Superman, on his 6'4 frame, only had 7.9% BF. Those are just two examples I found in two minutes of googling. Bale obviously is super human in his weight gain/loss for movies, but Affleck has never been a particularly fit man.

                  Comment


                    #54
                    Originally posted by thecharlesg View Post
                    [MENTION=12045]Matchbook[/MENTION] we have very different goals. I don't want to be very big at all. I'm happy with the size I am now, but I'd like to drop some bf. What I'm going for is Tyler Durden look, Brad Pitt in fight club. He is about 6' and was between 150-160 for the movie. Here is a pic.

                    Brad Pitt is obviously a handsome man. But Tyler Durden is considered by many women and gay men to be the hottest male movie character (google it if you don't believe me). I believe that in this day and age, in metropolitan areas, that is the physique women want. I'm married, so it's irrelevant to me anyway. Either way, I just want to be lean and ripped. Getting big is not appealing to me at all.

                    As for [MENTION=14885]APinNC[/MENTION] I would say if you're interested in defending yourself, spending time working on martial arts is more beneficial to spending time in the gym. Here in LA I don't know of too many fist fights happening, anyway. I know in the south it's more common. If you're in trouble in a bad neighborhood here, I would imagine your fists wouldn't be able to get you out of it. I personally don't take my family to bad neighborhoods. To me 6'2 240 is highly unappealing. At that weight you'd have to either be on gear or carrying around about 50 lbs of body fat. That is just not for me, either way.
                    For sure, totally understand your goals. When I was younger, I was sub 10% bf, six pack, vascular, blah blah. It looked great, but it was so hard for me to keep that physique. Turns out my frame holds weight well, and keeping my base strength is fairly easy. Brad Pitt is actually about 5'10"; not much difference from 6' in terms of relative height, but it's a big deal in terms of reaching a certain aesthetic. Even during FC filming, he admitted that keeping that physique was miserable and that his legs were reduced to nothing (hence the low bw).

                    Being bigger is not for everyone, but it suits me. Once I hit 24 or so, lifting was more fun for me as me body responded so much better. If you are able to get the Brad Pitt FC physique and keep it, then here's to you; especially since we are all normal working class guys who don't have the luxury of a movie star. Like I stated earlier, the "Gas Station ready" term got blown up way too literal, and I should have better explained it as more of a mindset. I have actually been attacked several times growing up, all random, unprovoked, and in "safe" places. The South is still an ugly place, so I've definitely had incentive to train as I do. However, now that I am older, it's definitely just a philosophy held by others besides myself. Training this way gives me a never ending goal to strive for, just as the sub 10% bf goals of days past.

                    Just understand though, you can be lean and ripped at any bodyweight. Matchbook is a good example of that; rock fucking solid, huge lifts, and also lean and ripped. As for myself, my frame carries 240 pounds quite easy. I am definitely not on gear, nor 50 pounds overweight. I have massive thighs from squatting since I was 25, and my ass and back are also very large for my frame. I am about 18%, so not fat or shredded. I am looking to get to 225 or so. Anything less, and I look extremely gangly. Just picture a smaller NFL tight end that been riding the bench too long; that's my physique. lol

                    Hey, but good luck on the physique goals. But remember the first rule of Fight Club
                    Last edited by APinNC; May 11, 2016, 01:39 AM.
                    We are here to drink beer. We are here to kill war. We are here to laugh at the odds and live our lives so well that Death will tremble to take us.” ― Charles Bukowski

                    Comment


                      #55
                      I run a lot and hardly make it to the gym. I try to maintain 40-50 miles per week but have noticed my strength fading after not going to the gym. I really need to get a body weight routine going at home which would be easier than driving to the gym and fighting the crowds for everything. Gold's Gym is only $12.50 per month but is always packed.

                      Comment


                        #56
                        My routine is pretty basic. I eat healthyish (mostly clean foods, but drink 1-2 Cokes per day and have a few bad meals per week) and am starting to workout a few times a week. My workouts are HIIT with the following exercises:

                        - Jump Rope
                        - Battle Rope
                        - Heavy Kettlebell Swings (70lbs)
                        - Pushups or Step Ups (depending on day)

                        I tend to float around 180, but would like to cut to 175... I think that cutting refined sugars (Coke and sweets) would do that pretty quickly. Like others have stated on here, I want to get into better shape to improve my current lifestyle, rather than have a lifestyle that centers around being in shape.

                        Comment


                          #57
                          [MENTION=2622]hornsup84[/MENTION] nothing was wrong with my math, I just don't find 20% body fat appealing. That probably as low as you could be at that size without gear. It is impossible to be 6'2 240 lean without gear (sub 10% bf).

                          Also all the actors that blow up for movies are on gear. It's naive to think they're not.

                          [MENTION=14885]APinNC[/MENTION] you can find varying height for Pitt online. Regardless, he is small but ripped.
                          My Youtube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCSs1xkOEoJdPfZ4KRW575qA

                          Comment


                            #58
                            Originally posted by JBarwick View Post
                            I run a lot and hardly make it to the gym. I try to maintain 40-50 miles per week but have noticed my strength fading after not going to the gym. I really need to get a body weight routine going at home which would be easier than driving to the gym and fighting the crowds for everything. Gold's Gym is only $12.50 per month but is always packed.
                            Gym logistics is one of the reasons I've taken more to hiking/walking/running/sprinting/hill work for fitness. With running, I can step outside anytime that's convenient and do my whole workout in about 30 minutes all-in... but my gym is a 15 minute drive and always so busy that on weekdays I have about a one-hour window to get my workout in while it's relatively quiet but before the gym closes.

                            Ideally, I would love to have my own lifting set-up but that's not realistic for me, since I live in an open-concept, 900 sq ft loft-style condo (it's basically one big kitchen/living/dining room with a bedroom and bathroom attached). My parents' house is about a 5 minute drive away and they've got a bench and a set of dumbbells in their basement, so I do sometimes invite myself there rather than go to the gym and have to share the squat cage with some guy doing bicep curls or something.
                            Ben

                            Comment


                              #59
                              Originally posted by JBarwick View Post
                              I run a lot and hardly make it to the gym. I try to maintain 40-50 miles per week but have noticed my strength fading after not going to the gym. I really need to get a body weight routine going at home which would be easier than driving to the gym and fighting the crowds for everything. Gold's Gym is only $12.50 per month but is always packed.
                              I recently started Freeletics for this very reason. I've been pleased so far. I don't think it's a plan to use if you're looking for a drastic change, but as far as maintaining health/building strength using body weight exercises - it's not bad at all.

                              Comment


                                #60
                                Originally posted by thecharlesg View Post
                                [MENTION=2622]hornsup84[/MENTION] nothing was wrong with my math, I just don't find 20% body fat appealing. That probably as low as you could be at that size without gear. It is impossible to be 6'2 240 lean without gear (sub 10% bf).

                                Also all the actors that blow up for movies are on gear. It's naive to think they're not.

                                [MENTION=14885]APinNC[/MENTION] you can find varying height for Pitt online. Regardless, he is small but ripped.
                                Fine for actors, I was just sticking with them because you put up Pitt in FC as your example. However, it's simply incorrect that you can't get below 20% BF at that size, unless you assume that all college and pro athletes are also on PEDs that they're tested for.

                                More examples:

                                http://breakingmuscle.com/sports/foo...men-fit-or-fat
                                http://www.ncaa.org/health-and-safet...-athletes-made

                                EDIT: I'm not saying it's likely or easy, but it isn't impossible at all. Similar to maintaining a figure like Pitt in FC for a prolonged period without working at it 24/7. As someone mentioned above, that's way more annoying and painful than it's worth to most people (particularly those who don't get paid to be in shape).
                                Last edited by hornsup84; May 11, 2016, 11:35 AM.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X