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The Prissypants Thread of Bickery and Giggle Slaps

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    The Prissypants Thread of Bickery and Giggle Slaps

    I have the Beasties on vinyl, including License to Ill, Paul's Boutique, and Check Your Head.

    I also have De La Soul on CD.

    #2
    You still buy CDs?

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      #3
      Oh, God, no! I bought that one back in the day, though, when LPs were scarce as hen's teeth.

      So for better or worse, I have a number of CDs in my music collection. I've replaced a few here and there with the LP version, especially if that is the more historically correct format, i.e., the release came out only on LP in the 50s, 60s, 70s, etc. I haven't felt as compelled to replace things that came out in the CD era on CD. Plus I have a pretty damned good CD player.

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        #4
        I have a few vinyls, but I find that almost all my music is on iTunes. A lot easier to Shazaam something I like and buy the song/album. Besides, I rarely get the time to sit back, play a record, and enjoy a glass of scotch.

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          #5
          wait..."rock it" is a hip hop slang term? Queen was saying we will rock you a long time ago and they weren't the first. I am a "hip hop head" and can't say that we can claim that. It is used universally at this point but rocking has been a rock and roll idiom for a long time. Rock and roll has always been about taking something to a bit of an extreme and just owning it despite what other people think. Often contrary to what other people think. If you are rocking a bow tie then you are making it work for you. But I digress, regardless of the origin, the point has been made.

          I think a better tone to this thread may have been "styles you can't rock no matter how hard you try".

          ON topic: Athletic jerseys outside of a sporting event. I won't say I can't stand it but it hardly ever looks good IMO, especially if that player isn't on the team anymore and wasn't an "all-time great".

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            #6
            [MENTION=11100]M. Montaigne[/MENTION], anyone who refers to records as vinyls is probably never going to appreciate the experience of sitting back and relaxing to an LP playing on the turntable.

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              #7
              Originally posted by Duvel View Post
              [MENTION=11100]M. Montaigne[/MENTION], anyone who refers to records as vinyls is probably never going to appreciate the experience of sitting back and relaxing to an LP playing on the turntable.
              ...What? Are they not made of vinyl anymore?
              To note, not dog in this at all as any music I actually buy (not much given LastFM, Pandora, etc.) is of the electronic file format.

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                #8
                They're not called vinyls. They never were. Sorry, I'm a longtime LP die-hard afficionado, and it drives me nuts to hear them called that.

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                  #9
                  an LP refers to the type of release, not the type of media. Not all vinyl records were LPs. A full studio release typically consists of 8 or more tracks and is referred to as an LP. Less than that, but more than a single is an EP. the term "record" has a specific industry meaning as well. When the media started diverging and multiple formats were viable, the other terms were needed. CD, digital, 8track, cassette, and vinyl. Technically you can buy an LP or record in any of those formats. So yeah, for people that grew up in the single media era, LP = vinyl. For people that grew up buying in the multiple media era it is different. Vinyl encompasses all of them made of vinyl.

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                    #10
                    Originally posted by idvsego View Post
                    an LP refers to the type of release, not the type of media. Not all vinyl records were LPs. A full studio release typically consists of 8 or more tracks and is referred to as an LP. Less than that, but more than a single is an EP. the term "record" has a specific industry meaning as well. When the media started diverging and multiple formats were viable, the other terms were needed. CD, digital, 8track, cassette, and vinyl. Technically you can buy an LP or record in any of those formats. So yeah, for people that grew up in the single media era, LP = vinyl. For people that grew up buying in the multiple media era it is different. Vinyl encompasses all of them made of vinyl.
                    Oh snap.


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                      #11
                      hey, personally I don't care what people call it. Just sharing the info as I understand it.

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                        #12
                        I have way more vinyl(s) than all of you.



                        -e

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                          #13
                          yeah, my stack isn't that big. Just to bring this full circle...

                          style I cant stand is vinyl jackets. Doesn't bother me for other people to wear them, I just don't like the way they feel.

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                            #14
                            This is so wrong, I don't even know where to begin. So I won't.

                            Originally posted by idvsego View Post
                            an LP refers to the type of release, not the type of media. Not all vinyl records were LPs. A full studio release typically consists of 8 or more tracks and is referred to as an LP. Less than that, but more than a single is an EP. the term "record" has a specific industry meaning as well. When the media started diverging and multiple formats were viable, the other terms were needed. CD, digital, 8track, cassette, and vinyl. Technically you can buy an LP or record in any of those formats. So yeah, for people that grew up in the single media era, LP = vinyl. For people that grew up buying in the multiple media era it is different. Vinyl encompasses all of them made of vinyl.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              You obviously have more history on the topic and I don't argue on the Internet so I will accept that I am wrong. If you have time and would care to educate me I would genuinely appreciate a PM.

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