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Beckett Simonon now has a Goodyear-Welted collection

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    Beckett Simonon now has a Goodyear-Welted collection

    Not sure if the constitutes as a "deal", but Beckett Simonon appears to have recently launched a line of Goodyear-Welted offerings ranging from $125-$140. Not a bad price for Goodyear-welt. So far, they have 6 different styles, with the double-monk being my personal fav at the moment. It appears they are still in their introductory phase and list that shoes will not be shipped until 11/20. Check out my signature below for a $15 credit towards an order. As a disclaimer, I am not affiliated with the company, just a fan of good deals.

    #2
    I've been waiting for this for some time. Time to bite the bullet.

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by jwfrasier View Post
      I've been waiting for this for some time. Time to bite the bullet.
      I felt the same way when I found out. So far, their non-welted shoes have gotten good reviews, but the extra perks of a goodyear welt at a great price have pushed me to dive in.

      Comment


        #4
        Guys, I think it's worth noting that a $130 goodyear welted shoe is an example of putting the cart before the horse.

        The point of a goodyear welt is that it allows for multiple resolings. It's a more expensive way to attach a sole to an upper (compared to gluing) but it's supposed to pay off in the long run since a sole wears out much faster than an upper. Goodyear welted shoes almost always have high quality expensive uppers and it would be a shame to throw out that upper after one year of wear just because the sole has worn out.

        What Beckett Simonen is doing here is realizing that there is a current menswear trend toward goodyear welted shoes. More men are purchasing high quality footwear which typically comes with a goodyear welt. Beckett Simonen is therefore offering a goodyear welt without understanding why you would want a goodyear welt. A $130 pair of shoes is almost certainly not worth resoling. The upper simply cannot be high quality leather at that price and the cost to resole is in the $80-100 ballpark. You may as well toss the shoes at that price.

        In summary, goodyear welts are desirable because they allow you to preserve your high quality upper through multiple resolings. They are not desirable simply because they are a superior manufacturing technique in their own right.

        Comment


          #5
          Very well put by AJG. When you put it that way it makes a lot of sense.

          Comment


            #6
            So much walnut... and HAH: "The Hughes Longwing pairs just as easily with your boardroom-ready power suit" - please don't wear these walnut longwings w/ a suit!
            Agree w/ everything AJG said. If you want something in this price range, either buy AE Seconds or shoes from Ebay (or Meermin, which are a bit more $$) or get stuff from the JCP collection which is cheaper and seems to be quite good. The leather just doesn't seem to look very good. But I'd be happy to be proven wrong!

            If you want to try them out, I'd go for these: http://www.beckettsimonon.com/collec...ng-camel-suede

            Comment


              #7
              I think we all know better than to compare these to AE's or a comparable maker. But for those interested in making the entry plunge into the dapper game, these aren't a bad start. I also think its really premature to assume the leather uppers aren't worth their price tag or even exceed it. For example, to throw a brand name out there, guys feel they are buying quality when getting a pair of Cole Haan's, but the quality of CH can vary widely. And resoling can come as cheap as $40 so to get a $130 pair resoled isn't that crazy of a plan. Hopefully the leather holds up that long but we won't know until its made and the reviews come through. Plus guys should be circulating their shoes and utilizing trees so most pairs can last a good while. At their price point, it really isn't a big splurge. Take it for its face value and don't over-criticize an option worth exploring. No one wants the dappered threads to become styleforum 2.0

              Comment


                #8
                I ordered it way back when they started up, and hated the leather. It was a shiny, almost photocopied plastic representation of a fine leather shoe. Almost like a picture of a better shoe.

                To be fair, I ordered hughes longwing in a strange predistressed shiny pattern, so some of these plain leathers might read better in person. What I got that time though I definitely wouldn't want to resole. I didn't even want to wear them, I returned them.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by rayguy24 View Post
                  I think we all know better than to compare these to AE's or a comparable maker. But for those interested in making the entry plunge into the dapper game, these aren't a bad start. I also think its really premature to assume the leather uppers aren't worth their price tag or even exceed it. For example, to throw a brand name out there, guys feel they are buying quality when getting a pair of Cole Haan's, but the quality of CH can vary widely. And resoling can come as cheap as $40 so to get a $130 pair resoled isn't that crazy of a plan. Hopefully the leather holds up that long but we won't know until its made and the reviews come through. Plus guys should be circulating their shoes and utilizing trees so most pairs can last a good while. At their price point, it really isn't a big splurge. Take it for its face value and don't over-criticize an option worth exploring. No one wants the dappered threads to become styleforum 2.0
                  I disagree. This has nothing to do with becoming dappered 2.0. You usually get what you pay for, especially when it comes to leather quality. Why would they give you higher quality leather at a lower price point than everyone else? Why would someone spend even $40 (not sure where you're getting your shoes resoled that cheap for since even local cobblers usually charge more than that) to get these resoled? It's similar to when I took my car in and they claim there were some minor oil leaks from several places. I asked the guy why I would spend $3000 on repairs for a car that is now worth $4500 max. I'd rather sell it and use the money as down payment for a new car. Same thing applies here.

                  It's smarter for people to spend $60 on Stafford shoes and replace those in a few years. You could have 2 pairs of Stafford shoes for less than the cost of 1 pair of these. Those aren't going to be AE quality leather either, but they don't claim to be and have much better reviews than these things.
                  Last edited by bruschetta; August 21, 2013, 02:22 PM.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by AJG Esq View Post
                    Guys, I think it's worth noting that a $130 goodyear welted shoe is an example of putting the cart before the horse.

                    The point of a goodyear welt is that it allows for multiple resolings. It's a more expensive way to attach a sole to an upper (compared to gluing) but it's supposed to pay off in the long run since a sole wears out much faster than an upper. Goodyear welted shoes almost always have high quality expensive uppers and it would be a shame to throw out that upper after one year of wear just because the sole has worn out.

                    What Beckett Simonen is doing here is realizing that there is a current menswear trend toward goodyear welted shoes. More men are purchasing high quality footwear which typically comes with a goodyear welt. Beckett Simonen is therefore offering a goodyear welt without understanding why you would want a goodyear welt. A $130 pair of shoes is almost certainly not worth resoling. The upper simply cannot be high quality leather at that price and the cost to resole is in the $80-100 ballpark. You may as well toss the shoes at that price.

                    In summary, goodyear welts are desirable because they allow you to preserve your high quality upper through multiple resolings. They are not desirable simply because they are a superior manufacturing technique in their own right.
                    One of the best posts I've ever read. Well spoken, sir.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I don't think AJG was saying that Beckett Simonon was a good or a bad value at its price point. I think he was just saying that paying extra for a Goodyear welt at Beckett Simonon's price point is a bad value. If you like one of their shoes, just get the ones with a glued sole and save yourself the extra dough.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by Vicious49 View Post
                        I disagree. This has nothing to do with becoming dappered 2.0. You usually get what you pay for, especially when it comes to leather quality. Why would they give you higher quality leather at a lower price point than everyone else? Why would someone spend even $40 (not sure where you're getting your shoes resoled that cheap for since even local cobblers usually charge more than that) to get these resoled? It's similar to when I took my car in and they claim there were some minor oil leaks from several places. I asked the guy why I would spend $3000 on repairs for a car that is now worth $4500 max. I'd rather sell it and use the money as down payment for a new car. Same thing applies here.

                        It's smarter for people to spend $60 on Stafford shoes and replace those in a few years. You could have 2 pairs of Stafford shoes for less than the cost of 1 pair of these. Those aren't going to be AE quality leather either, but they don't claim to be and have much better reviews than these things.
                        Trust me fellas, I understand your points and agree to a certain extent. I am the proud owner of several high-end shoes, but we're talking about $130 here, not $350. Guys drop $100 on glued shoes and then trash em. So what if someone that doesn't want to throw down a couple hundred bucks on better quality shoes is willing to throw down an extra $30 or so on shoes that are Goodyear-welted. Maybe the leather holds up long enough for a resole, maybe it doesn't. But keep in mind also that GYW shoes don't only have the perks of resoling, but they also have the comfortable cork bed which over time mold to the shape of your feet. Many of the good reviews of AE's etc compliment how comfortable they are for dress shoes. With these entry level GYW's, it gives guys yet another option to choose from. Plus leather soles with GYW looks great!

                        As far as the car example goes, it all depends on your own perspective. If you are fine parlaying the value of your car into a monthly payment for 5 years, that is your prerogative. Others will happily spend the $3K on something that gets them from point A to point B, while keeping their pockets a couple hundred bucks deeper each month.
                        Last edited by bruschetta; August 21, 2013, 02:23 PM.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Hello guys, I’m glad to be part of the discussion.

                          Full disclosure: My name is Nicholas Hurtado and I’m the co-founder of Beckett Simonon.

                          Just a few key points worth considering before making general assumptions:

                          1. Full-grain leather shoes can in fact be of great quality at a $120 - $150 price-point if you are selling DIRECTLY to consumers. Normally all shoe manufacturers work with traditional retailers aka “middlemen” for their distribution and sales. In the footwear retail industry the average markup is 2.5X, meaning that whatever the retailer buys at catalog wholesale price is then multiplied by a factor of 2.5 to get the final price to consumer. So for example, a pair of shoes that retails at $310 in a store was in fact sold to the retailer for $125 (catalog wholesale price).

                          What we are doing is selling online DIRECTLY to consumers. No middlemen, no retailers, no distributors. In technical terms, we are selling at whole prices to consumers. Our retail chain is much shorter hence the prices are lower by definition.

                          Point A: Quality doesn’t necessarily determine price, while distribution channel and complete retail chain generally does.

                          Point B: You don’t get what you pay for. Product cost is only a small fraction of the price you pay. What really adds to a product price is the promotion, distribution and sales channels, not the materials and manufacturing cost of the product itself.

                          2. This collection is offered with a 1-year warranty over manufacturing and materials defects. In the $250+ shoes arena the industry average is just 3 months. As far as I’m aware the admirable guys at Red Wings are one of the few lefts still offering a 1 year-warranty. I just want to point that we stand behind our products. If we weren’t sure that our Goodyear-Welted shoes are built to last we wouldn’t be offering such warranty policy.


                          3. These shoes can in fact be resoled and we are looking to establish partnerships with selected US cobblers to make the process seamless. I guess the reasoning of asking if it’s worth paying for a resoling of a $135 shoes is short-term focused. As you guys cleverly point, Goodyear-Welted shoes are a long-term investment. I’m not a numbers guy but the answer seems pretty clear to me.

                          Case 1. $310 shoes + 2 resole jobs at $75 each = $460

                          Case 2. $125 shoes + 2 resole jobs at $75 each = $285

                          The $75 price is what NuShoe http://www.nushoe.com/ charges for what they call an executive recrafting service (Full leather soles, new leather heel base, refinish and condition of upper leather, hand polishing and new laces). This company manages the recrafting programs of several footwear brands.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            That was a lot to digest there nicholas lol. Crazy to see how far dappered thread conversations reach.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Nicholas, welcome to the forums! It's nice to have another menswear company represented on here!

                              For future reference, you're more than welcome to reply to posts that our posters create about your products. If you are interested in advertising on the forums, please contact Joe by visiting Dappered.com/ and click the "Email us" link in the right-hand sidebar.

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